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This page shows some articles and links to another Website concerning Earth Geological Events.

https://watchers.news/


Most of the people throughout the world will not believe the reality of the End of the World; understood as the Great Tribulation Period, which is actually the End of the Age of Grace and the Beginning of the Millennial Age, until an earthquake causes the ground to move beneath their feet and the sky rolls black with volcanic ash and their entire Earth Life is being destroyed right before their eyes...


The goal of these pages dealing with Geological Events, Earthquakes, Volcanoes and Tsunamis is to help you understand the reality of these events, as they will eventually become a chaotic worldwide event...

 

The Sea and the Waves Roaring

The Great Tribulation Period begins with Earthquakes, continues with Volcanic Eruptions on the landmass, then with Volcanic Eruptions on the Ocean Floor throughout the world.

As the Volcanic Eruptions begin to heat up the water in the oceans, along with the changes of the ocean currents from the changing of the tilt of the earth, there will be massive Hurricanes occurring towards the very end of the Great Tribulation Period.

The greatest degree of these Massive Hurricanes will most likely be produced during the Wrath of God with last about 45 days; after the Rapture of the Christian Believers and before the Second Coming of the Lord Jesus Christ.

 

The "Sea and Waves Roaring" could also be referring to Tsunamis.

But do not rule out Hurricanes...


And there shall be signs in the sun and in the moon and in the stars; and upon the earth distress of nations, with perplexity; the sea and the waves roaring; men's hearts failing them for fear and looking after those things which are coming on the earth: for the powers of heaven shall be shaken. And then shall they see the Son of man coming in a cloud with power and great glory. And when these things begin to come to pass, then look up and lift up your heads; for your redemption draweth nigh.

 Luke 21:25-28.


What about the “the sea and the waves roaring;”? Can we find any insight as to what the Lord was talking about?

Check out these links for information about: "the sea and the waves roaring."
 
01.   Tsunami
03.   Megatsunami


 


The Sea and the Waves Roaring  
 
A composite of the seventeen different English translations and the definitions from a Lexicon:
 
There will be signs in the sun and moon and stars; and upon the land of the earth, anxiety, anguish, doubt, fear and distress among the nations in a state of perplexity with bewilderment and confusion, as of a mental loss of having no way out, by reason and because of the billowing and vibration of the loud roaring confusion caused by the noise of the sea waves. Men’s hearts failing them and fainting from fear in apprehension, expectation and waiting for the things which are about to come upon the whole habitable earth, for the forces and powers of the heavens shall be moved and shaken.
Luke 21:25-26.   www.biblos.com 

An expanded translation using more Greek Lexicons definitions:

And there shall be signs, tokens and wonders in the light of the sun; and in the moon; and in the constellation of the stars; and upon the whole earth anguish, anxiety and distress of nations, with a state of perplexity and mental loss; standing in doubtful confusion as what to do, being in a bewilderment, having no way out; because of the loud roaring of the sea and the waves being in a roaring vibration; men’s hearts failing them for fear and having an apprehension, an expectation and an arrival; looking after those things which are coming on the land of the earth: for the powers of heaven shall be moved and shaken. And then shall they see the Son of man coming in a cloud with power and abundant, great glory. And when these things begin to come to pass, then raise, look up and lift up your heads; for on this account, your deliverance and full redemption approaches and is drawing near. Luke 21:25-28.

King James Version: Revelation 8:8 And the second angel sounded, and as it were a great mountain burning with fire was cast into the sea: and the third part of the sea became blood;


King James Version: Revelation 8:9 And the third part of the creatures which were in the sea, and had life, died; and the third part of the ships were destroyed.


Check out these links to understand about the great mountain burning with fire in the sea, (submarine volcanoes); the sea becoming blood, (red tide) and the third part of the ships being destroyed, (tsunami).

04.   Tsunami Images 
06.   Red Tides 
09.   Dinoflagellate Images      


 

Hurricane Images
Click on the Links and the images will help you understand the Biblical terms:
Sea and Waves Roaring



 

Hurricanes form over tropical oceans, where warm water and air interact to create these storms.

From:

http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/facts/hurricanes.html


Hurricane Sandy as seen from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on October 28, 2012. Image courtesy of NOAA/NASA.


Hurricane Sandy as seen from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on October 28, 2012. Image courtesy of NOAA/NASA.


In the Atlantic and Northeast Pacific, we use the term "hurricane" to describe severe storms with high-velocity winds that rotate around a central, low-pressure core. The same type of disturbance in the Northwest Pacific is called a “typhoon” and “cyclones” occur in the South Pacific and Indian Ocean.


In order for a hurricane to form, two things must be present: a weather disturbance, such as a thunderstorm, that pulls in warm surface air from all directions and water at the ocean’s surface that is at least 80° Fahrenheit (27° Celsius). Because it is the interaction of warm air and warm seawater that spawns these storms, they form over tropical oceans between about 5 and 20 degrees of latitude. At these latitudes, seawater is hot enough to give the storms strength and the rotation of the Earth makes them spin.


Hurricanes start simply with the evaporation of warm seawater, which pumps water into the lower atmosphere. This humid air is then dragged aloft when converging winds collide and turn upwards. At higher altitudes, water vapor starts to condense into clouds and rain, releasing heat that warms the surrounding air, causing it to rise as well. As the air far above the sea rushes upward, even more warm moist air spirals in from along the surface to replace it.


As long as the base of this weather system remains over warm water and its top is not sheared apart by high-altitude winds, it will strengthen and grow. More and more heat and water will be pumped into the air. The pressure at its core will drop further and further, sucking in wind at ever increasing speeds. Over several hours to days, the storm will intensify, finally reaching hurricane status when the winds that swirl around it reach sustained speeds of 74 miles per hour or more.


Eventually, hurricanes turn away from the tropics and into mid-latitudes. Once they move over cold water or over land and lose touch with the hot water that powers them, these storms weaken and break apart.


Recent studies have shown a link between ocean surface temperatures and tropical storm intensity – warmer waters fuel more energetic storms.



 


Warm Ocean Water and Hurricanes




Between June 1st and November 30th and peaking between late August and mid-September, the Atlantic Ocean becomes a meteorological mixing bowl, with all of the ingredients necessary to create the recipe for hurricanes. And when it does, NASA has a cadre of satellites ready to serve up a feast of information to the forecasters who seek to monitor and better understand these awesome storms.


Satellite image of Hurricane Fabian.

Right Image: Sea-viewing Wide-Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) instrument on the Orbview-2 satellite captured this picture of Fabian Sept. 4, 2003, near Bermuda but not too far from the United States' East Coast. Click image to zoom into Hurricane Fabian Credit: NASA/Orbimage. Click here for high resolution image.


NASA satellites are critical in helping forecasters determine if all of the ingredients are coming together to make a hurricane, and if so, how strong the hurricane may be, and who in coastal communities and at sea will be at risk. NASA satellites improve hurricane forecasts using space-based observations, data assimilation, and computer climate modeling. NASA-sponsored measurements and modeling of global sea surface temperature, precipitation, winds and sea surface height have also improved our understanding of El Nino and La Nina events, which tend to enhance and suppress Atlantic and Gulf hurricane development, respectively.


Thirty years ago, meteorologists were unable to see the factors in hurricane formation and could only spot a hurricane with still pictures from the TIROS-N satellite. Over the past 10 years, visible and infrared satellite sensors were still the workhorses for monitoring hurricanes. Now, multiple NASA satellites exploit everything from radar pulses to microwaves to enhance forecasts, providing data to researchers several times a day.


Take Warm Water, Stir

Sea surface temperatures must be 82 degrees Fahrenheit (F) or warmer for tropical cyclone formation and sustenance. The Aqua satellite's Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager can detect sea surface temperatures (SST) through clouds, which is valuable information in determining the direction a tropical cyclone is moving and whether it may strengthen or weaken. Traditional satellite measurements of SST use infrared instruments and are limited to cloud-free regions. The Jason-1 satellite altimeter provides data on sea surface height, a key measurement of ocean energy available to encourage and sustain hurricanes.


Sea surface temperatures (SSTs) taken by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer Sea surface temperatures (SSTs) taken by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer

Images to left: Orange and red indicate the necessary 82-degree and warmer sea surface temperatures (SSTs) needed. The data for this image was collected by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR/E) aboard the Aqua satellite from May 2002. Click images to see animation


Next, add a disturbance, seen in right image, generally easterly waves off of Africa, formed from winds resulting from the clash between the hot Sahara Desert and the cooler Gulf of Guinea. These waves provide the initial energy and spin required for a hurricane to develop, as imaged by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES, operated by NOAA) on Sept. 1-15, 2001.


Mix Thoroughly, Bake

Another necessary ingredient is rotating winds over the ocean's surface. These winds are a precursor to tropical cyclone development and the SeaWinds instruments aboard Japan's Midori 2 and NASA's QuikSCAT satellites can detect these winds before other instruments, providing even earlier notice of developing storms to forecasters and scientists.


Wind speed/direction, from Seawinds instrument on QuikScat satellite [NASA/NASDA]

Image to left: Wind speed/direction, from Seawinds instrument on QuikScat satellite. Click image to see animation of winds mixing with sea surface temperatures to form a hurricane. Credit: NASA


With the right mix of winds and SSTs, an ordinary cluster of tropical thunderstorms can explode into a tropical storm. Winds converge, forming the familiar circular pattern of clouds. Warm, rising air in the storms draws water vapor up from the ocean. The vapor condenses in clouds and releases heat, warming the eye, evaporating more surface water and feeding the hurricane's heat engine, continuing the cycle.


Hurricane Heat Engine

Air temperature and humidity are also important factors. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) experiment suite aboard the Aqua satellite obtains measurements of global temperature and humidity throughout the atmosphere. Improved representation of atmospheric temperature and humidity may lead to improved weather forecasts and improved determination of cyclone intensity, location and tracks and the severe weather associated with storms, such as damaging winds.

Animation of hurricane's heat engine Cloud structure, from Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. Click image to see movie of hurricane's heat engine. Credit: NASA/NASDA

Hurricanes essentially act as engines, drawing energy up from warm tropical ocean waters to power the intense winds, powerful thunderstorms, and immense ocean surges. Water vapor from the warm ocean surface evaporates, forming towering convective clouds that surround the eyewall and rainband regions of the storm. As the water vapor cools and condenses from a gas back to a liquid state it releases latent heat. The released heat warms the surrounding air, making it lighter and promoting more clouds. Because the hurricane-speed winds surrounding the clear eye are often absent from the center of a hurricane, the heaviest rain clouds are pushed out to form a ring around the center, leaving a relatively fair-weather eye.


Model Hurricane

Rainfall intensity is the final ingredient, and the TRMM Precipitation Radar provides "cat-scan"-like views of rainfall in the massive thunderstorms of hurricanes. TRMM instruments probe young tropical systems for rainfall intensity. These initial disturbances of thunderstorms could hint at tropical storm development based on rainfall intensity. TRMM also sees "hot towers" or vertical columns of rapidly rising air that indicate very strong thunderstorms. These towers are like powerful pistons that convert energy from water vapor into a powerful wind and rain producing engine.


Animation of hurricane model

By synthesizing data from multiple instruments and satellites, scientists get a full picture of the many ingredients of a hurricane. Click image to see animation of hurricane model. Credit: NASDA/NASA


Once a storm develops, TRMM provides an inside view of how organized and tightly spiraled rainbands are, key indicators of storm intensity.


TRMM covers the global tropics and doesn't rely on a tropical disturbance being close to land to determine its intensity from hurricane hunter flights through it. TRMM provides tropical cyclone intensity information from the safe distance of space. For this reason the Hurricane Center and the Department of Defense's Joint Typhoon Warning Center often rely on TRMM, QuikSCAT and other NASA satellites for early assessment of young storms in the open ocean.


The hurricane monitoring capabilities enabled by these satellites are funded by NASA's Earth Science Enterprise (ESE), whose mission is to protect and understand our home planet by enabling improved prediction capability for climate, weather, and natural hazards

FUTURE OF FORECASTING

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite, furnishes three-dimensional views of temperature, humidity and clouds in the atmosphere. AIRS observes the temperatures of cloud tops via infrared energy, and, with the help of a pair of companion microwave-energy sensors, maps temperature and humidity inside and below clouds. This shows scientists a storm's inner structure, including its most intense regions. A high-resolution visible wavelength sensor adds information about the clouds' fine structure. With AIRS, these observations come simultaneously from a single satellite, while previously scientists coordinated observations taken hours apart from several satellites


three-dimensional views of temperature, humidity and clouds in the atmosphere of Supertyphoon Pongsona

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder experiment on NASA's Aqua spacecraft reveals important new information to supplement the familiar overhead views of hurricanes (called typhoons in the Western Pacific) that come from satellites. Here AIRS shows some of the internal temperature structure of Supertyphoon Pongsona just as it hit the island of Guam on December 8, 2002. Click image to see more information and animation about this image.



 

The Effect of Sea Surface Temperature on Hurricanes

This video segment adapted from NOVA scienceNOW highlights research that supports the idea that warmer oceans generate and sustain more intense hurricanes. Ongoing monitoring of sea surface temperature (SST) has supplied evidence that the world's oceans warmed 0.5°C between 1970 and 2005. Because hurricanes rely on warm water to release heat into the upper atmosphere and create spiraling winds, any additional energy can result in increased intensity. The video examines factors scientists use to predict hurricane behavior, and states that the complex nature of hurricane formation makes predicting with a high degree of accuracy very difficult.


From:  https://aetn.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/clim10.sci.ess.watcyc.seasurftemp/the-effect-of-sea-surface-temperature-on-hurricanes/#.WaV-uOlOmUl

 




Luke 21:25

New International Version
"There will be signs in the sun, moon and stars. On the earth, nations will be in anguish and perplexity at the roaring and tossing of the sea.

New Living Translation
"And there will be strange signs in the sun, moon, and stars. And here on earth the nations will be in turmoil, perplexed by the roaring seas and strange tides.

English Standard Version
“And there will be signs in sun and moon and stars, and on the earth distress of nations in perplexity because of the roaring of the sea and the waves,

Berean Study Bible
There will be signs in the sun and moon and stars, and on the earth dismay among the nations, bewildered by the roaring of the sea and the surging of the waves.

Berean Literal Bible
And there will be signs in sun and moon and stars; and upon the earth distress of nations with perplexity, sea roaring and surge rolling,

New American Standard Bible
"There will be signs in sun and moon and stars, and on the earth dismay among nations, in perplexity at the roaring of the sea and the waves,

King James Bible
And there shall be signs in the sun, and in the moon, and in the stars; and upon the earth distress of nations, with perplexity; the sea and the waves roaring;

Holman Christian Standard Bible
"Then there will be signs in the sun, moon, and stars; and there will be anguish on the earth among nations bewildered by the roaring sea and waves.

International Standard Version
"There will be signs in the sun, the moon, and the stars, and there will be distress on earth among the nations that are confused by the roaring of the sea and its waves.

NET Bible
"And there will be signs in the sun and moon and stars, and on the earth nations will be in distress, anxious over the roaring of the sea and the surging waves.

New Heart English Bible
There will be signs in the sun, moon, and stars; and on the earth anxiety of nations, in perplexity for the roaring of the sea and the waves;

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
And there shall be signs in the sun and in the moon and in the stars and in the earth, suffering of nations and clasping of hands, from the alarm of the sound of the sea,

GOD'S WORD® Translation
"Miraculous signs will occur in the sun, moon, and stars. The nations of the earth will be deeply troubled and confused because of the roaring and tossing of the sea.

New American Standard 1977
“And there will be signs in sun and moon and stars, and upon the earth dismay among nations, in perplexity at the roaring of the sea and the waves,

Jubilee Bible 2000
Then there shall be signs in the sun and in the moon and in the stars, and upon the earth distress of nations, with perplexity; the sea and the waves roaring;

King James 2000 Bible
And there shall be signs in the sun, and in the moon, and in the stars; and upon the earth distress of nations, with perplexity; the sea and the waves roaring;

American King James Version
And there shall be signs in the sun, and in the moon, and in the stars; and on the earth distress of nations, with perplexity; the sea and the waves roaring;

American Standard Version
And there shall be signs in sun and moon and stars; and upon the earth distress of nations, in perplexity for the roaring of the sea and the billows;

Douay-Rheims Bible
And there shall be signs in the sun, and in the moon, and in the stars; and upon the earth distress of nations, by reason of the confusion of the roaring of the sea and of the waves;

Darby Bible Translation
And there shall be signs in sun and moon and stars, and upon the earth distress of nations in perplexity [at] the roar of the sea and rolling waves,

English Revised Version
And there shall be signs in sun and moon and stars; and upon the earth distress of nations, in perplexity for the roaring of the sea and the billows;

Webster's Bible Translation
And there shall be signs in the sun, and in the moon, and in the stars; and upon the earth distress of nations, with perplexity; the sea and the waves roaring;

Weymouth New Testament
"There will be signs in sun, moon, and stars; and on earth anguish among the nations in their bewilderment at the roaring of the sea and its billows;

World English Bible
There will be signs in the sun, moon, and stars; and on the earth anxiety of nations, in perplexity for the roaring of the sea and the waves;

Young's Literal Translation
And there shall be signs in sun, and moon, and stars, and on the land is distress of nations with perplexity, sea and billow roaring;

 


One of the most destructive events during the Great Tribulation Period will be the Volcanic Burning of the Vatican City in Rome, Italy....

The Volcanic Burning of the Vatican City


Revelation 18: [8] Therefore shall her plagues come in one day, death, and mourning, and famine; and she shall be utterly burned with fire: for strong is the Lord God who judgeth her. [9] And the kings of the earth, who have committed fornication and lived deliciously with her, shall bewail her, and lament for her, when they shall see the smoke of her burning, [10] Standing afar off for the fear of her torment, saying, Alas, alas, that great city Babylon, that mighty city! For in one hour is thy judgment come. [15] The merchants of these things, which were made rich by her, shall stand afar off for the fear of her torment, weeping and wailing, [17] For in one hour so great riches is come to naught. And every shipmaster, and all the company in ships, and sailors, and as many as trade by sea, stood afar off, [18] And cried when they saw the smoke of her burning, saying, What city is like unto this great city! [19] And they cast dust on their heads, and cried, weeping and wailing, saying, Alas, alas, that great city, wherein were made rich all that had ships in the sea by reason of her costliness! For in one hour is she made desolate.

The Greek word definitions:

Revelation 18:8 - utterly burned with fire - to burn up, blasted and consume by fire.


Revelation 18:9 & 19 - the smoke of her burning - the burning by which metals are roasted and reduced; by a figure drawn from a refiners fire; calamities or trials that test the character.


Revelation 18:10 & 15 torment - to torture, a testing by the touchstone, which is a black siliceous stone used to test the purity of gold or silver by the color of the streak produced on it by rubbing it with either metal.


Revelation 18:17 & 19 - come to naught & made desolate - to make desolate, lay waste, to ruin, bring to desolation, to despoil one, strip her of her treasures.


For more information, be sure to check out these two pages on my Website:
Be sure to check out these Videos on my Website. Some of the information are pictures and there are some truly amazing live Volcanic Eruptions. The Videos will open up to a small screen size, but you can simply click on the expand icon on the lower right corner and the Video will open up to the full size of your Screen.:

27.27 Volcanic Destruction

28.28 Volcano Videos

29.29 Destruction of Rome

30.30 The Fury of the Lord by Volcanic Fire


 


tropical storm harvey at 21 00 utc on august 29 2017

Harvey breaks record for most rainfall from tropical cyclone in the contiguous US

Although it's still not over, Tropical Cyclone "Harvey" has now dumped more rain on the contiguous United States than any previous tropical cyclone since records began. The most rainfall produced by any tropical cyclone in the entire US was 1 320.8 mm...

August 29, 2017



 

Articles tagged "2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season"

tropical storm harvey houston august 27 2017

Texas has never seen an event like this, could be the worst flooding disaster in US history

Category 4 Hurricane "Harvey" made landfall around 03:00 UTC on Saturday, August 26, 2017 at Rockport, Texas with winds of 215 km/h (130 mph). It then stalled over the coast of central Texas, dumping extreme amounts of rain. Harvey is the first major...

August 28, 2017

hurricane harvey at 16 45 utc august 24 2017 goes 16

Harvey rapidly strengthened into a hurricane, expected to stall over Texas coast

Tropical Storm "Harvey" rapidly strengthened into a hurricane today and is expected to become a major, Category 3 hurricane before it makes landfall over the coast of Texas late Friday or early Saturday (local time), August 25 or 26, 2017. Preparations for...

August 24, 2017

harvey forecast track august 2017

Harvey regenerates, hurricane and storm surge watches issued for Texas coast

What used to be Tropical Storm "Harvey" degenerated to an open wave on August 19 and regenerated back into a tropical depression on August 23, 2017. Further strengthening is expected and Harvey could become a hurricane on August 25 while approaching the...

August 23, 2017

tropical storm harvey at 06z august 18 2017

Tropical Storm "Harvey" moving over Windward Islands into the Caribbean Sea

Tropical Storm "Harvey" formed 21:00 UTC, August 17, 2017 east of the Windward Islands in the North Atlantic Ocean as the 8th named storm of the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season. Harvey is expected to move through the Windward Islands and into the eastern...

August 18, 2017

three tropical systems develop along the itcz in the northeast atlantic

Three tropical systems develop along the ITCZ in the northeast Atlantic

The National Hurricane Center is tracking three low pressure systems along the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone in the northeast Atlantic. Current models show that conditions are conducive for them to continually organize and strengthen over the next several days....

August 16, 2017

goes 16 atlantic ocean 14 15 z

NOAA: 2017 Atlantic hurricane season has the potential to be extremely active

In a scheduled update for its 2017 Atlantic hurricane season outlook issued August 9, 2017, NOAA forecasters are now predicting a higher likelihood of an above-average season, and they increased the predicted number of named storms and major hurricanes. The season...

August 10, 2017

tropical storm franklin at 18 10 z August 9 2017 f

Franklin, the first hurricane of the 2017 Atlantic season is about to hit Veracruz

At 21:00 UTC on August 9, 2017, Franklin became the first hurricane of the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season. The system is expected to hit the Mexican state of Veracruz tonight (CDT) or early Thursday, August 10. Heavy rains brought by this storm will be capable of...

August 09, 2017

tropical storm franklin at 15 z august 7 2017

Tropical Storm "Franklin" about to hit Yucatan peninsula, Mexico

Tropical Storm "Franklin" formed 03:00 UTC on August 7, 2017 over the northwestern Caribbean as the sixth named storm of the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season. Franklin is strengthening and moving toward the Yucatan peninsula where it is expected to make...

August 07, 2017

tropical storm emily 12 30 z july 31 2017 goes 16

Tropical Storm "Emily" forms near Florida, makes landfall

Tropical Storm "Emily" formed west of Tampa Bay, Florida just before 12:00 UTC on July 31, 2017. A Tropical Storm Warning has been issued for the west coast of Florida from Anclote River southward to Bonita Beach. As of 12:00 UTC (08:00 EDT) on July 31,...

July 31, 2017

tropical storm don july 17 2017 at 21z goes 16

Tropical Storm "Don" forms, moving toward the Windward Islands

Tropical Storm "Don" formed east of the Windward Islands at 21:00 UTC on July 17, 2017, as the fourth named storm of the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season. Watches and warnings are in effect for portions of the Windward Islands. At 21:00 UTC on July 17, the...

July 17, 2017

tropical storm cindy june 21 2017 us gulf coast

Tropical Storm "Cindy" hits US Gulf Coast

The center of Tropical Storm "Cindy" crossed the coast between Cameron, Louisiana and Port Arthur, Texas between 07:00 and 08:00 UTC (02:00 and 03:00 CDT) on Thursday, June 22, 2017. Although Cindy is now weakening, it will continue to produce heavy...

June 22, 2017

tropical storm cindy 17 15 z on june 20 2017

Tropical Storm "Cindy" forms, heavy rain spreading across central Gulf Coast

Potential Tropical Cyclone Three has acquired a well-defined center today and at 18:00 UTC it officially became Cindy, the third named tropical cyclone of the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season. Heavy rain produced by this system is spreading across much of the central...

June 20, 2017

potential tropical cyclone three 08 45 z june 20 2017

Gulf Coast prepares for flooding rains, strong winds, rip currents and high surf

The National Hurricane Center (NHS) is tracking a tropical disturbance in the Gulf of Mexico which is expected to reach the US Gulf Coast late Wednesday or Wednesday night (local time), June 21, 2017, bringing between 101 to 203 mm (4 to 8 inches) of rain, with...

June 20, 2017

tropical storm bret satellite june 19 2017

Tropical Storm "Bret" forms, threatens Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela and Windward Islands

An unusually early tropical storm has formed in the Atlantic Ocean near Venezuela and Trinidad and Tobago at 21:00 UTC on June 19, 2017 and was named Bret. This is the earliest Atlantic MDR (Main Development Region) named storm since records began in 1851. The prior...

June 19, 2017



 


hurricane matthew noaa goes october 2016

Above-normal 2016 hurricane seasons

The Atlantic, eastern Pacific and central Pacific 2016 hurricane season have officially ended on November 30, and NOAA scientists said all three regions saw above-normal seasons. For the Atlantic, this was the first above-normal season since 2012 with 15 named...

December 01, 2016

hurricane otto central america november 24 2016 suomi npp

Record-breaking Hurricane "Otto" hits Nicaragua and Costa Rica

Hurricane "Otto" has made landfall as a Category 2 storm just before 18:00 UTC on November 24, 2016 near the town of San Juan de Nicaragua in southern Nicaragua, on the border with Costa Rica. A number of people are dead or missing in Costa Rica. Before it...

November 25, 2016

hurricane otto november 23 2016 suomi npp

Otto is now the strongest Atlantic hurricane this late in the season since 1934

Otto, now the strongest Atlantic hurricane this late in the season since 1934, is on its way to Nicaragua and Costa Rica with winds of 165 km/h (105 mph). Landfall is expected within the hurricane warning area during November 24, 2016. Heavy rainfall,...

November 24, 2016

hurricane otto november 22 2016 suomi npp

Hurricane "Otto" kills 4 in Panama, to hit Costa Rica and Nicaragua

Hurricane "Otto" formed on November 22, 2016 in the Caribbean Sea as the 7th hurricane of the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season, including record-breaking, early season Hurricane "Alex" of January 2016. Otto was nearly stationary system since it...

November 23, 2016

nicole full forecast track suomi npp satellite image october 17 2016 on google earth

Remnants of Hurricane "Nicole" to hit Greenland and Iceland

Nicole, now a post-tropical cyclone, is finally losing its tropical cyclone characteristics as it merges with a frontal system over the cold waters of the North Atlantic, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) reports. The swells from the system are still expected to...

October 18, 2016

hurricane nicole october 12 2016 goes

Hurricane "Nicole" set for Bermuda: Hazardous conditions and severe weather expected

Hurricane "Nicole", currently a Category 2 system, is heading toward Bermuda and is expected to pass over the island early October 13, 2016. The Bermuda Weather Service has placed a hurricane warning into effect, alerting the residents to expect hazardous...

October 12, 2016

cape brenton canada flooding hurricane matthew

50 000 without power as Matthew's remnants slam Nova Scotia, Canada

Remnants of Hurricane "Matthew" slammed Canadian provinces of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland on October 10, 2016 with high wind and heavy rain. This powerful storm was a result of the remnants of Hurricane "Matthew" meeting up with a system off...

October 11, 2016

north carolina flooding october 2016

Record-breaking flooding hits North Carolina, officials fear worst natural disaster

Record river flooding continues in eastern North Carolina after heavy weekend rain produced by now-dissipated Hurricane "Matthew" fell on already saturated soil. As of early October 11, Matthew's US death toll has climbed to at least 23, with nearly...

October 11, 2016

hurricane matthew 18 30 utc october 7 2016 united states goes east satellite

Hurricane "Matthew" summary: data, images and videos - September/October 2016

Tropical wave Invest 97L, soon to become Hurricane "Matthew," was named on September 25, 2016, when it was located just southwest of the Cape Verde Islands. Matthew became the 13th named storm of the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season on September 28. By...

October 10, 2016

hurricane matthew october 7 2016 00 45 f

Hurricane "Matthew" pounding Florida

Hurricane "Matthew" has left a trail of destruction in Haiti and Cuba, moved over the Bahamas while intensifying into a Category 4 storm and approached the east coast of Florida late on Thursday, October 6, 2016. By 06:00 UTC on October 7, Matthew weakened...

October 06, 2016

3hurricane matthew on october 4 2016 terra modis f

Matthew hits Cuba, passing directly over the Bahamas toward Florida

After making landfall near Les Anglais in western Haiti at 11:00 UTC on October 4, 2016, with maximum sustained winds of 230 km/h (145 mph) and gusts to 278 km/h (172 mph), Matthew slowed down, made a second landfall on the eastern tip of Cuba around 00:00 UTC...

October 05, 2016

matthew hits haiti 11 15 utc october 4 2016

Hurricane "Matthew" makes direct hit on Haiti causing over 1 000 deaths

Category 4 Hurricane "Matthew" has made landfall near Les Anglais in western Haiti at 11:00 UTC on October 4, 2016. As of early October 10, the number of people it killed as it crossed the island was over 1 000. At the time of the landfall, Matthew had...

October 04, 2016

hurricane matthew goes east 06 45 october 4 2016

Florida declares state of emergency ahead of Hurricane "Matthew"

Florida Governor Rick Scott has declared a state of emergency for all counties ahead of Hurricane "Matthew", a life-threatening Category 4 storm. Scott signed the executive order on Monday, October 3, 2016, while visiting the City of Hialeah Emergency...

October 04, 2016



 


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Matthew bearing down on Haiti, claims first victims

The center of Category 4 Hurricane "Matthew" will pass directly over or very near southwestern Haiti around 12:00 UTC on October 4, 2016. Matthew has already claimed its first victims in Haiti, leaving at least two persons dead, authorities said Monday,...

October 04, 2016

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Hurricane-force winds, extreme rainfall expected in Haiti and Cuba - Hurricane "Matthew"

Category 4 Hurricane "Mathew" is moving northward across the central Caribbean Sea toward Haiti, threatening the island with extreme rainfall and hurricane-force winds. Matthew is expected to pass just west or over the western tip of Haiti and hit...

October 03, 2016

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Life-threatening Hurricane "Matthew" to hit Jamaica, Haiti, Cuba and the Bahamas

​Category 4 Hurricane "Matthew" is expected to approach southwestern Haiti and Jamaica during the UTC afternoon of Monday, October 3, 2016. Matthew is bringing extremely heavy rain, very powerful winds and a combination of dangerous storm surge and high...

October 02, 2016

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Matthew becomes a major hurricane, turn toward Jamaica and Cuba expected

Matthew became a major, Category 3 hurricane at 15:00 UTC today while passing over the south-central Carribean Sea. A Tropical Storm Warning is currently in effect from the Colombia/Venezuela border to Riohacha. The path of the system remains uncertain, and the...

September 30, 2016

Hurricane_Newton_forecast_track_with_72_hours_of_rainfall_accumulation_ending_15_UTC_on_7sep2016_f

After two landfalls in Mexico, Newton moves into Arizona as a post-tropical cyclone

After hitting Baja California and Sonora, Mexico as a Category 1 hurricane, Newton is now a post-tropical cyclone located over Arizona, United States. There was no major damage in Baja California, but the storm killed at least 2 people when a fishing boat capsized...

September 07, 2016

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Newton to hit Baja California as a hurricane, reach Arizona on September 7

Tropical Storm "Newton" (15E) has formed near the west coast of Mexico on September 5, 2016. The system is strengthening and is expected to make landfall over the southern tip of Baja California early Tuesday (UTC), September 6. A dangerous storm surge is...

September 05, 2016

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Hurricane "Lester" passing northeast of Hawaiian Islands

Hurricane "Lester" is passing northeast of Hawaiian Islands as a category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale on September 3, 2016. Gradual weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours. A Hurricane Watch is in effect for the Maui...

September 03, 2016

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Deadly Hurricane "Hermine" makes landfall in the Big Bend area, Florida

At least one person has been killed after a Category 1 Hurricane "Hermine" made landfall near Saint Marks in Florida's Big Bend area early Friday, September 2, 2016. Hermine has caused severe coastal damage and is now a tropical storm making its way...

September 02, 2016

Selection_625

The peak of northern hemisphere's 2016 tropical cyclone season

As of August 30, 2016, there are six active tropical cyclones across the Atlantic and Pacific ocean. In the Pacific, they are Hurricane "Madeline," Hurricane "Lester," and Tropical Storm "Lionrock." In the Atlantic, they are tropical...

August 30, 2016

earl_feat

Tropical Storm "Earl" causes flooding and traffic disruptions in Belize, flash floods and mudslides expected in Mexico

After making landfall over Belize, Tropical Storm "Earl" continues to move inland, lashing southern Mexico with heavy rainfall. Tropical Storm Warning has been issued for parts of Mexico, as intense winds and heavy rainfall may induce life-threatening...

August 05, 2016

hurricane_earl_belize_landfall_3 4aug2016_f

Earl becomes a hurricane hours before Belize landfall

Tropical Storm "Earl" formed on August 2 near Jamaica and strengthened into a hurricane by 21:00 UTC on August 3. Earl will make landfall over Belize within a couple of hours, and start weakening as it moves toward Mexico. Earl is bringing strong winds and...

August 03, 2016

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Darby hits Hawaii, Frank swirls near Mexico, Georgette becomes a hurricane

As of 12:00 UTC on July 25, 2016, there are 3 active tropical systems in the central and eastern Pacific - Tropical Storm "Darby", Tropical Storm "Frank" and Hurricane "Georgette". While Darby hit Hawaii over the weekend and is still...

July 25, 2016

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Tropical Storm "Frank" forms, to pass near the coast of Baja California, Mexico

Tropical Storm "Frank" formed late July 21, 2016, about 455 km (285 miles) south of Manzanillo, Mexico, as the sixth named storm of the 2016 eastern Pacific hurricane season. Frank is moving over warm waters and is expected to become a hurricane early on...

July 22, 2016

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Darby becomes the third hurricane of the 2016 eastern Pacific hurricane season

Tropical Depression 05E formed on July 11, 2016, off the coast of western Mexico and strengthened into a tropical storm named Darby on July 12. By 21:00 UTC on July 13, Darby became the third hurricane of the 2016 eastern Pacific hurricane season. Additional...

July 14, 2016

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Hurricane "Celia" to weaken as it moves away from Mexico

Tropical Depression 04E strengthened into a tropical storm on July 8, 2016, and was named Celia. By Sunday, July 10, Celia strengthened into a second hurricane of the 2016 eastern Pacific hurricane season. At 15:00 UTC on July 8, the center of Tropical Storm...

July 12, 2016

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Hurricane "Alex" becomes the strongest January hurricane in Atlantic since records began in 1851

Subtropical Storm "Alex" formed in the far eastern Atlantic Ocean at 21:00 UTC on January 13, 2016, and intensified into a hurricane at 15:00 UTC on January 14. The occurrence of the system during this time of the year is very unusual, as only four known...

January 14, 2016

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Hurricane "Pali" becomes record-breaking

At 03:00 UTC on January 12, Tropical Storm "Pali", which formed on January 8, reached hurricane strength and thus became the earliest hurricane on record in the central Pacific basin, far to the southwest of Hawaii. "After exhibiting a rather...

January 12, 2016



 


hurricane_sandra_feat

Hurricane "Sandra" threatens Mexico with heavy rainfall

Sandra developed over the warm eastern Pacific waters on November 24, 2015 and quickly intensified into a hurricane. The system is now a major Category 4 hurricane, about 800 km southwest of Mexico and moving northwards. The hurricane poses no threat to the mainland...

November 26, 2015

hurricane_kate_feat

Hurricane "Kate" inducing dangerous surfs and rip currents in Bermuda

Hurricane "Kate" developed as the system was moving away from Bermuda on November 11, 2015. Kate is currently racing in the east-northeast direction across the Atlantic and is expected to merge with an approaching extratropical low over the next couple of...

November 11, 2015

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Hurricane "Patricia" rapidly dissipates over land, major disaster avoided

Damage assessments following the rapid passage of Hurricane "Patricia" continue to report significantly lower amounts of devastation across Mexican land than predicted. Hundreds of homes were devastated and 8 people were reported dead, as of October 25,...

October 26, 2015

patricia_mexico

Patricia makes landfall in Mexico, major flooding ongoing

Hurricane "Patricia" slammed into the coast of southwestern Mexico on October 23, 2015, with winds reaching 270 km/h (165 mph) and was downgraded to a category 2 hurricane since, National Hurricane Center (NHC) reported. So far no victims have been...

October 24, 2015

patricia_feat3

Hurricane "Patricia" became the strongest hurricane ever recorded in the eastern North Pacific and Atlantic

Extremely dangerous Hurricane "Patricia" became the strongest hurricane ever recorded in the eastern North Pacific and Atlantic on October 23, 2015, National Hurricane Center (NHC) announced. Patricia is now a category 5 hurricane and is expected to make...

October 23, 2015

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Extremely dangerous Hurricane "Patricia" places Mexico on high alert

Extremely dangerous Hurricane "Patricia" is expected to make landfall in Mexico on October 23, 2015, National Hurricane Center (NHC) reported. The system is currently racing toward Mexico while still gaining strength over the warm waters of eastern...

October 23, 2015

olaf_feat

Major Hurricane "Olaf" forecast to bring life-threatening surfs to Hawai'i and heavy rainfalls across Central America

Hurricane "Olaf" developed over the waters of central Pacific on October 19, 2015, and reached category 4 status by October 20, according to Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC). Despite not making a direct landfall, large swells and rip currents could...

October 20, 2015

hurricane_joaquin_uk_feat

Hurricane "Joaquin" racing toward Ireland and UK

Joaquin, now a category 1 hurricane, has left behind the waters of Bermuda, and is now crossing over on the other side of the North Atlantic, rushing toward Ireland and UK. Although the system is still of a hurricane strength it is expected to weaken significantly...

October 07, 2015

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Joaquin lashes the Bahamas, historic flooding expected across southeast US

Major Hurricane "Joaquin" has weakened slightly as its eye passed near San Salvador island, and is now a category 3 hurricane, National Hurricane Center (NHC) reported. Although newest modeling results suggest the system most likely won't make landfall...

October 02, 2015

hurricane_joaquin_feat

Joaquin now extremely dangerous category 4 hurricane: Bahamas ravaged, life-threatening floods expected across US East Coast

Tropical Storm "Joaquin" that was lurking close to Bahamas, as of September 29, 2015 has now evolved into a major category 4 hurricane, and is currently passing over the Bahamas. Deadly flash floods and extreme weather conditions are expected across the...

October 01, 2015

kilo_crossing_date_line_featured

Hurricane "Kilo" becomes a typhoon after crossing the International Date Line

Hurricane "Kilo" formed over 1 000 km (621 miles) of the shore of Hawaii islands in the late August and has crossed an International Date Line between the eastern and western Pacific between September 1 and 2, 2015. It, thus, became known as a Typhoon "Ki

September 02, 2015

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Tropical Storm "Fred" to hit the Cabo Verde islands with hurricane force

A new tropical cyclone formed in the Atlantic on August 30, 2015, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) reports. Tropical Storm "Fred" is currently on the way to the Cabo Verde islands, and its intensity is increasing at a fast pace. The system is expected to hi

August 30, 2015

hurricane_jimena_on_aug292015_uw cimss_f

Hurricane "Jimena" becomes a major hurricane in the eastern Pacific

Hurricane "Jimena", a tenth named storm of the 2015 eastern Pacific hurricane season, has evolved into a major hurricane in only a couple of days, and although is currently located well of the mainland, its rapid intensification requires a careful observation.

August 29, 2015

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Hurricane "Ignacio" to pass close to Hawaii

Hurricane "Ignacio" is another tropical system to form in the busy 2015 eastern Pacific hurricane season. The storm evolved into a hurricane through August 27, 2015 and is currently moving more than a thousand kilometers (over 620 miles) of the Hawaii islands.

August 29, 2015

hurricane_danny_uw_cimss_aug202015_at_15 45_utc_f

Danny becomes first hurricane of the 2015 Atlantic hurricane season

On August 20, 2015, Tropical Storm "Danny" strengthened into the first hurricane of the 2015 Atlantic hurricane season. It's current forecast track takes it near or over Antigua and Barbuda and St. Kitts and Nevis on August 24, toward Puerto Rico and the

August 20, 2015

typhoons_pacific2

The tropical activity across Pacific basin sets a new record: ACE index in NW Pacific highest since 2002

The tropical cyclone activity in the western North Pacific Ocean and the eastern North Pacific Ocean has set a new record in the 2015, meteorologists report. However, in the Atlantic basin, so far, not even a single hurricane was reported. According to the available dat

August 20, 2015

hurricane_guillermo_aug22015_f

Hurricane "Guillermo" - fifth hurricane of 2015 eastern Pacific hurricane season moving toward Hawaii

Tropical Storm "Guillermo" formed on July 30, 2015 about 3 190 km (1 980 miles) ESE of Hilo, Hawaii and by July 31 it strengthened into the fifth hurricane of 2015 eastern Pacific hurricane season.Infrared image taken by GOES-West on July 30 showed bands of th

August 02, 2015



 



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Tropical Storm "Blanca" makes landfall in Baja California peninsula

The center of Tropical Storm "Blanca" has made landfall near Puerto Cortes, Mexico in Baja California Sur on Monday, June 8, 2015. This is the earliest landfall of a tropical cyclone on record in the Baja California peninsula, NWS NHC reports.At 12:00 UTC, Bl

June 08, 2015

hurricane_blanca_on_june_6_2015_f2

Blanca to impact southern Baja California as a tropical storm

Hurricane "Blanca" lost its intensity over the past 48 hours and is now a Category 2 hurricane with a general weakening trend. Blanca is facing increased wind shear, drier, more stable air, and cooler waters which will weaken her into a tropical storm as it ap

June 06, 2015

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Blanca expected to become the earliest Category 5 hurricane in the eastern Pacific

2015 eastern Pacific hurricane season has just began and is already setting records. With Hurricane "Andres" reaching Category 4 on Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale on June 1 and Hurricane "Blanca" reaching Category 4 on June 3 this is the

June 04, 2015

andres_and_blanca_on_june22015_f2

Tropical Storm "Blanca" expected to rapidly intensify off the Pacific coast of Mexico

Tropical Storm "Blanca" formed on June 1, 2015 about 535 km (332 miles) SSW of Zihuatanejo, the Pacific coast of Mexico. At the moment, Blanca is nearly a stationary system with a slow and erratic motion expected over the next couple of days followed by a phas

June 02, 2015

hurricane_andres_at_06 30_utc_on_jun22015_cimss_track

Hurricane "Andres" briefly reached category 4, far off Mexico's Pacific coast

Tropical Storm "Andres" formed on May 28, 2015 far off the Pacific coast of Mexico and became the first named storm of the 2015 eastern Pacific hurricane season. Andres was heading WNW (away from the coastline) and on June 1 it briefly reached category 4 (of 5

June 02, 2015

2014_hs

Bellow-average Atlantic and busy Pacific hurricane seasons draw to end

Hurricane season officially ends on November 30, and while the Atlantic season was relatively quiet, as predicted, the Pacific was at its most active in two decades, US meteorologists said.A number of weather conditions this year, such as strong vertical wind shear,

November 27, 2014

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Category 2 Hurricane "Vance" targets western Mexico

Hurricane Vance is now located south of Isla Socorro in the Pacific Ocean and is moving northward toward western Mexico. In its report issued at 21:00 UTC on November 3, 2014, NHC reported maximum sustained winds of 175 km/h (110 mph) with gusts up to 215 km/h (135

November 04, 2014

VANCE_FDCweb

"Vance" to become hurricane as it moves toward western Mexico

Tropical Depression 21E in the eastern Pacific Ocean strengthened overnight on October 30 and by morning October 31 it developed into Tropical Storm "Vance". The system is slowly organizing as it moves west-northwestward. Further strengthening is expected as

November 02, 2014

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Remnants of Hurricane "Gonzalo" still deadly after reaching Europe

Remnants of Hurricane "Gonzalo", the first Category 4 Atlantic hurricane since Ophelia in 2011, reached United Kingdom on October 21, 2014, with strong winds of up to 123 km/h (77 mph). One person has died as the tail end of Gonzalo hit land causing

October 22, 2014

hurricane_ana_terra_modis_oct_17_2014

Hurricane "Ana" spinning south of Hawaii

Tropical Storm "Ana" reached hurricane status on Friday, October 17, and approached the Big Island of Hawaii late evening. Ana is currently producing high waves along some shorelines. Heavy rains prompted a flood advisory, strong winds caused officials to

October 18, 2014

hurricane_gonzalo_from_iss_2

"Gonzalo" makes direct hit on Bermuda as Category 2 hurricane

Hurricane "Gonzalo" made a full landfall on British island of Bermuda about 23:30 UTC (20:30 local time) on Friday, October 17, as the 56 km wide (35 miles) eye of the storm crossed the south-central coast of the island, the U.S. National Hurricane Center in

October 18, 2014

hurricane_gonzalo_noaa_goes_oct_16_2014

Hurricane "Gonzalo" strengthens as it barrels toward Bermuda

Hurricane "Gonzalo", the second major hurricane of the 2014 Atlantic season after Hurricane "Edouard", has strengthened overnight and is again a dangerous Category 4 hurricane today as it tracks toward the small British island territory of Bermuda.

October 16, 2014

Gonzalo_Worldview

"Gonzalo" becomes major hurricane in Atlantic Ocean

Hurricane "Gonzalo" has become the second major hurricane of the 2014 Atlantic season, after Hurricane "Edouard". Gonzalo is currently moving away from the Virgin Islands and northern Leeward Islands, and targets Bermuda later this week. It has good

October 14, 2014

SIMON_rb0 lalo

Hurricane "Simon" became eight major hurricane of the 2014 Pacific season

Hurricane "Simon" has become the eighth major hurricane of the 2014 Eastern Pacific hurricane season, according to data from a NOAA Hurricane Hunter aircraft. This ties the record for major hurricanes set in 1983, 1992, and 1993.NHC determined that at 21:00

October 05, 2014

tropical_storm_odile_goes_west_cimss_sep_16_2014_b

Tropical Storm "Odile" aims U.S. Southwest, heavy rain expected

At 09:00 UTC today the center of Tropical Storm "Odile" was located about 40 km WNW of Santa Rosalia, Mexico, bringing strong winds and heavy rains to the central portions of the Baja California peninsula. Its heavy rains are likely to result in life-threateni

September 16, 2014

hurricane_odile_sep_15_2014_vis inf_cimss_f

Odile crashes into Mexico as a powerful Category 3 hurricane

Hurricane "Odile" crashed into Mexico's Los Cabos resorts on Monday, September 15, 2014, forcing about 30 000 people to seek shelters. It is the strongest hurricane to make landfall this year anywhere and the strongest on record to hit Baja California.Odil

September 15, 2014

remnants_of_hurricane_norbert_bring_recordbreaking_rainfall_southwest

Remnants of Hurricane "Norbert" produced record breaking rainfall in U.S. Southwest

Record breaking rainfall produced by the remnants of former Hurricane "Norbert" drenched much of the U.S. Southwest on September 8, 2014. Flash flooding in southern Arizona resulted in deaths of two people. Massive rainfall and flash flooding was also seen in

September 09, 2014



 




hurricane_norbert_sep_5_2014

Hurricane "Norbert" hits Mexico, forces evacuations

Tropical Storm "Norbert" was formed on September 2 about 180 miles (285 km) southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico's Pacific coast. Around 03:00 UTC on Friday, September 5, Norbert was Category 1 hurricane with maximum sustained

September 06, 2014

hurricane_marie_on_aug_26_2014

Massive hurricane "Marie" affecting southern California coast

Marie formed off of Mexico's southwestern coast at 03:00 UTC on August 22 consolidating into Tropical Depression 13-E and strengthened into a tropical storm by 09:00 UTC. Over the next two days Marie rapidly intensified and reached Category 4 hurricane status b

August 27, 2014

very_active_eastern_and_central_pacific_ocean_aug_4_2014

Tropical Storm "Genevieve" forms, dies, resurrects and intensifies to Super-Typhoon

Tropical Storm "Genevieve" was born on Friday, July 25 at 09:00 UTC in Eastern Pacific Ocean. At the time it had maximum sustained winds near 40 mph (65 km/h) and was located about 1 490 miles (2 400 km) east-southeast of South Point,

August 09, 2014

hurricane_iselle_approaching_hawaii_on_aug_7_2014

Tropical Storm "Iselle" hits Hawaii, brings heavy rain and strong winds

Hurricane "Iselle" weakened to a tropical storm while approaching the island of Hawaii on Thursday August 7, 2014. As a tropical storm Iselle still contained some heavy rain showers and strong winds when it hit the big island early Friday, August 8. It downed

August 08, 2014

iselle_julio_vs_hawaii_viirs_suomi_npp_aug_5_2014

Double trouble - Hawaii braces for hurricanes "Iselle" and "Julio"

NOAA's Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) issued a Tropical Storm Watch for Hawaii and Maui Counties in Hawaii on August 6 at 12:00 UTC as hurricanes "Iselle" and "Julio" continued on their path toward the islands. Weathe

August 07, 2014

Arthur_extratropical_feat

Arthur becomes post-tropical system

Arthur made landfall in Nova Scotia as tropical storm early on July 5, 2014, reaching wind speed of 105 km/h (65 mph). Tropical storm force winds with heavy rainfall were reported across Nantucket and portions of Massachusetts and eastern

July 05, 2014

3Arthur_iss_040e030560_2July2014

Hurricane "Arthur" opens 2014 Atlantic hurricane season

Tropical Storm Arthur formed on July 2 and strengthened into a hurricane today, the first of the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season. Heavy rains are expected to affect the southern U.S. coastline over the next several days.Arthur could reach a Category 2

July 03, 2014

hurricane_christina_ep_tw_f_via_conagua

Hurricane "Cristina" formed off the coast of Mexico

Tropical Storm "Cristina" formed off the coast of Mexico on June 9, 2014, and strengthened into a category 1 hurricane today. Intense rain is anticipated in Jalisco, Colima, Michoacan, Guerrero, Oaxaca and Nayarit. The system is located close to the

June 11, 2014

Hurricane_Amanda_may_26_2014_goes_west_IR_edit_f

Hurricane "Amanda" becomes strongest Eastern Pacific May hurricane on record

A week after the official start of 2014 Eastern Pacific hurricane season its first tropical depression was born southwest of Mexico. By May 23rd the system organized and strengthened into the first tropical storm of the season and was named "Amanda". 

May 26, 2014

Raymond_ODIS

Category 3 Hurricane Raymond impacts western Mexico

Low pressure System 96E developed quickly over the weekend of October 19 and 20 and by October 21 had grown into Hurricane Raymond. ​Hurricane Raymond, now a major Category 3 storm, continues to intensify in Eastern Pacific waters, just off the southwest

October 22, 2013

hurricane_manuel_sep_19_2013

Manuel re-intensified to hurricane strength, expected to make landfall again

Two tropical storms, Ingrid and Manuel, brought heavy rainfall and caused destruction and chaos throughout Mexico over the last couple of days. Current estimates are that 80 people have been killed. The forecasters are warning of more storms ahead as Manuel

September 19, 2013

8Henriette

Hurricane Henriette moving away from Hawaii

Hurricane Henriette continues moving through the Eastern Pacific Ocean as Category 1 hurricane. According to latest public advisory issued by US National Hurricane Center (NHC), the center of Hurricane Henriette was located about 1285 miles (2065 km) E of Hilo,

August 08, 2013

Erick_MODIS

Hurricane Erick weakened into tropical storm

Erick, the fourth hurricane of the Eastern Pacific Hurricane Season, weakened into tropical storm on July 7, 2013. The circulation of Erick remains strong but the cyclone has lost most of its thunderstorm activity. Winds decreased to around 60 mph (95

July 08, 2013

Dalia_GOES15

Dalila strengthened to hurricane, moving away from southern Mexico coast

Tropical Storm Dalila strengthened to hurricane status on July 2, 2013. Dalila became the third hurricane of the 2013 Eastern Pacific Hurricane Season. The system should begin weakening in a day or so as it interacts with drier air and the developing

July 02, 2013

20130625 Cosme

Cosme became hurricane and weakened into tropical storm again

Cosme is the second hurricane of the 2013 Eastern Pacific season. During late May, Barbara became a hurricane just prior to making landfall near Puerto Arista, Mexico in the Gulf of Tehuantepec. On June 26, 2013, Hurricane Cosme was battering Clarion Island,

June 26, 2013

TD2

Second tropical depression of Atlantic season developed near the coast of Belize

A tropical disturbance moving from the western Caribbean toward southeastern Mexico became Tropical Depression Two near the coast of Belize on June 17, 2013. The clouds associated with the depression stretch much farther, from far western Cuba, to the eastern

June 18, 2013

sandy

NASA's computer simulation shows track of Hurricane Sandy

Hurricane Sandy pummeled the East Coast late in 2012’s Atlantic hurricane season, causing 159 deaths and $70 billion in damages. Days before landfall, forecasts of its trajectory were still being made. Some computer models showed that a trough in the jet stream

June 08, 2013



 



Andrea_GOES FULL__

Tropical Storm Andrea formed in eastern Gulf of Mexico and heading toward Florida

The first tropical storm of 2013 Atlantic hurricane season is named Andrea. Low pressure System (91L) in the Gulf of Mexico became better organized and strengthened into tropical storm on June 5, 2013.  Andrea has been lingering in the northwestern

June 06, 2013

Nadine_modis

NASA's HS3 mission may target Cape Verde Island hurricanes in 2013

The Atlantic hurricane season runs primarily from June 1 through November 30, peaking in mid-September. The Cape Verde Islands off the coast of western Africa are a region where a number of tropical cyclones form during the Atlantic hurricane season.

June 03, 2013

_HurricaneBarbara

Barbara dissipated after making landfall in southern Mexico as Category 1 hurricane

Tropical Storm Barbara weakened after landfall as Category 1 hurricane at southern Mexico coastline near Tonala in Chiapas State on May 29, 2013. Latest satellite images and surface observations indicate that Barbara no longer has a well-defined center

May 31, 2013

TS_Barbara_MODIS

Tropical Storm Barbara formed in Eastern Pacific, aims southern Mexico

The structure of low level pressure area (Invest 92E) in Eastern Pacific has improved dramatically since the last 12 hours. Infrared satellite images have even shown an eye-like feature during the past couple of hours and the system became Tropical Storm

May 29, 2013

IR_Goes_West

New tropical disturbances formed in eastern Pacific

US National Hurricane Center (NHC) reported showers and thunderstorms associated with the area of low pressure centered about 200 miles south-southwest of the Gulf of Tehuantepec. The system is moving northward direction towards the coast of southern

May 28, 2013

Atlantic hurricanes karl igor julia 2010 noaa1

NOAA predicts very active Atlantic hurricane season - 3 to 6 major hurricanes

June 1 marks the beginning of Atlantic hurricane season. On May 23, 2013 NOAA's Climate Prediction Center released its 2013 Atlantic Hurricane Season Forecast, predicting an active season. NOAA classifies 12 of the 18 seasons since 1995 as above normal,

May 26, 2013

tropic_pacific

Tropical Storm Alvin dissipated, new low pressure system is forming

Alvin had strengthened to a Tropical Storm on May 15, 2013 and now has weakened and is considered a Post-Tropical Cyclone. With the excessive wind shear and cooler water, the storm has dissipated into just a weak low pressure. According to Tropical Weather

May 18, 2013

Alvin

Tropical Storm Alvin marks the beginning of 2013 eastern Pacific hurricane season

May 15th marked the start of the 2013 Eastern Pacific hurricane season, and right from the start, the first tropical depression and subsequent tropical storm of the season has formed. Tropical Storm Alvin, off the coast of Mexico, is the first named

May 16, 2013

Michael_Sept_6_2012

The 2012 Atlantic Hurricane season in 4.5 minutes

A relative active 2012 Atlantic Hurricane Season produced 19 named storms with 10 hurricanes. This year had 7 storms more than the historical average. Atlantic hurricane season started  officially with June 1, and it ends on November 30, 2012. This season started

November 30, 2012

goes

Hurricane Sandy timelapse videos - GOES 13 satellite view

A complete timelapse animation of Hurricane Sandy from October 23-31, as seen by GOES-13 (a geosynchronous satellite that is in orbit nearly 36,000 km (23,000 miles) above Earth).Another timelapse animation from GOES-EAST (GOES-13) shows the full disk and the

November 02, 2012

Selection_095

New Jersey devastated - Ruptured gas lines, fires rage on island of Mantoloking

Flames were burning all over the cut-off barrier island of Mantoloking, New Jersey on Wednesday morning, October 31, 2012 after severe devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy. There was a large cluster of flames and smaller fires spread out from it, with some flames

October 31, 2012

Selection_090

Sandy's deadly aftermath - millions without power, major flooding and destruction

As Hurricane Sandy churned slowly inland US, millions along the East Coast awoke on Tuesday, October 30, 2012 without power or mass transit.By latest reports more than 150 people were killed in US. New York was among the hardest hit, with its financial market closed

October 30, 2012

sandy track list of nuclear stations to the arrival point area. Radius 200 km

Three nuclear power plants shut down as Sandy ravages northeastern US

Hurricane Sandy forced three nuclear power plants to shut and put another on alert as federal regulators dispatched inspectors to monitor 11 facilities in the path of the storm.(1) An alert was declared at the Oyster Creek nuclear power plant in New Jersey because

October 30, 2012

20121028 sandy enh full

How big and serious is Sandy and why?

Sandy is now post-tropical cyclone. Regardless its hurricane status, Sandy, dubbed Frankenstorm, is a massive system that will affect a huge swath of the eastern U.S. It is now evident that it may become the biggest storm of century. The circulation of Sandy could

October 30, 2012

Selection_088

Hurricane Sandy - live coverage, latest public advisory and satellite imagery

Follow latest Hurricane Sandy conditions, public advisory, satellite imagery and live web cam with us. Livestream Storm Cam - "Sandycam" is located on top of Livestream's World Headquarters in Chelsea, Manhattan, New York City. The camera is mounted on the roof facing

October 29, 2012

xxirg8bbm2

Hurricane Sandy on trail to become historic "Perfect storm"

On October 26, 2012, Hurricane Sandy churned over the Bahamas, with the eye of the storm near the island of Grand Bahama. Destructive Sandy is gradually pulling away from the Bahamas, leaving more than 40 dead behind. As it approaches US East Coast, states of emergency

October 27, 2012

GERVISIR

Hurricane Sandy forms in the Caribbean Sea

Hurricane Sandy has formed in the Caribbean Sea. Sandy is now a Category 1 hurricane, and is about 30 miles south of Kingston, Jamaica. Environmental conditions are expected to remain favorable for additional strengthening to occur up until Sandy makes landfall on

October 25, 2012



 



nadine enh full

Nadine weakens to a Tropical Storm again

Nadine weakens a little more and becomes a Tropical Storm again.Nadine formed as a tropical depression over the Atlantic Ocean on September 11, 2012, and strengthened to a tropical storm the following day. Between September 12 and October 1, 2012, Nadine’s status

October 01, 2012

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Nadine becomes hurricane again

According to latest public advisory issued by National Hurricane Center (NHC) at 03:00 UTC on September 30, the eye of Hurricane Nadine was located near latitude 35.6 north and longitude 37.5 west, about 970 km ( 605 miles) WSW of the Azores. Nadine is moving

September 30, 2012

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Super Typhoon Jelawat gusts up to nearly 300 km/h, heading toward Japan

Super Typhoon Jelawat in the Western Pacific is forecast to curve across Okinawa and the Japan mainland, bringing flooding rain, monstrous waves and damaging winds. The islands can be subject to damaging winds in excess of 120 km/h (75 mph), dangerous surf and seas

September 26, 2012

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Miriam became major hurricane - begins to weaken

Hurricane Miriam has continued to rapidly strengthen yesterday and forecasts show a deeper and more robust cyclone in the next few days as the storm tracks toward Baja California. Miriam has weakened over the last several hours. The eye has become overcast and cloud

September 25, 2012

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Hurricane Nadine aims Azores

The eighth hurricane of a 2012 season will continue to churn east in the Atlantic this week. Hurricane Nadine set its eye on the Azores. For second time this season Azores will be impacted by a hurricane which is quiet a rare occurrence in one season.Nadine begins

September 17, 2012

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Tropical Storm Nadine strengthens in the Atlantic - on path to become next hurricane

Tropical Storm Nadine is becoming better organized and could soon become the next hurricane in the Atlantic Basin. Maximum sustained winds are near  100 km/h (65 mph) with higher gusts. Some strengthening is forecast during the next 48 hours and Nadine is expected

September 13, 2012

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Tropical storm path plot shows Louisiana and Mississippi more prone to hurricane activity than other states

Hurricane Isaac and Hurricane Katrina made landfall on almost the same day on the same location, with 7 year difference. Some areas of US are just more prone to hurricane activity than others. Especially, Louisiana and Mississippi.Here are plotted the paths of the

September 09, 2012

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Tropical Storm Michael became Category 3 hurricane in less than 12 hours

Michael became the first major hurricane of the season early this morning as it moved northeastward. Rapid intensification from a tropical storm to a Category 3 hurricane occurred in less than 12 hours as Michael entered a very favorable environment.Michael is the

September 06, 2012

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Isaac's remnant emerges as new low pressure system in Gulf of Mexico

A tropical disturbance associated in part with the remnants of Isaac, is lingering in the Gulf of Mexico along the Florida Panhandle. Very humid air, combined with the disturbance could unleash downpours and caused flash flooding from part of the Louisiana coast to

September 06, 2012

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Leslie become hurricane, aims Bermuda, US East Coast and Atlantic Canada

Leslie strengthens into the sixth hurricane of the Atlantic season and it's aiming Bermuda as it moves northward. Leslie is a large tropical cyclone that is forecast to grow in size over the next several days. The wind field of the cyclone, combined with its expected

September 05, 2012

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Tropical storms Kirk and Leslie spinning in Atlantic

Hurricane Kirk downgraded to a Tropical Storm and is currently moving rapidly northeastward toward the North Atlantic  and Tropical Storm Leslie is becoming less organized. Meanwhile, Tropical Depression Isaac has lost tropical characteristics while moving across

September 02, 2012

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Hurricane Kirk and Tropical Storm Leslie formed in Atlantic

Four storms in the tropical Atlantic and Pacific are in various stages of development. Tropical Storm Isaac is slowly weakening over central Louisiana, but is still producing heavy rain, severe weather and high water levels along the northern Gulf coast. Hurricane

August 31, 2012

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Isaac downgraded to a tropical rainstorm - storm surge, inland flooding and tornadoes hazards remain

Slow-moving Isaac weakens to a depression over northern Louisiana but flooding rains continue across southeastern Louisiana and Mississippi. Isaac has officially been downgraded to a tropical rainstorm. All coastal warnings have been discontinued. Even though Isaac

August 31, 2012

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Isaac's eye wall to pass 'right over' Louisiana sinkhole

Slow-moving Isaac is dumping heavy rains and still producing a significant storm surge across southeastern Louisiana.Strong bands of thunderstorms continue to develop over water in the eastern semicircle and also southwest of the center. They have occasionally

August 29, 2012

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Category 1 Hurricane Isaac lashing the Gulf Coast with thunderstorms, gusty winds and storm surge flooding

Residents along the northern Gulf coast are bracing for the arrival of Isaac, which was recently upgraded to a Category 1 hurricane. Center of Isaac nearing the coast of southeast Louisiana. Storm surge flooding already occurring along the coast of southeast

August 29, 2012

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Isaac reached Cuba, expected to become strong hurricane tomorrow

Isaac is currently a strengthening tropical storm in the Caribbean. After some weakening due the Cuba landfall, rapid intensification is expected once Isaac enters the Gulf of Mexico. Tropical Storm Isaac still lacks organization in its inner core and limited

August 25, 2012

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Atlantic Tropical Weather Outlook - August 23/24

Two powerful tropical storms are moving through north Atlantic waters - TS Isaac and TS Joyce. Isaac is located about 165 miles south of San Juan, Puerto Rico and recently upgraded Joyce is located about 1305 miles east of the Leeward Islands. Another tropical wave,

August 23, 2012



 



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Tropical Storm Isaac aims Carribean archipelago

Tropical Depression 9 was upgraded in Tropical Storm and it got named - Isaac. Hurricane hunter aircraft found tropical storm force winds in the Atlantic system Tuesday afternoon. The system is now moving toward a favorable environment with much warmer water and

August 22, 2012

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Hurricane Gordon passed the Azores without major damage

Gordon is the strongest tropical system recorded so far in the Atlantic Basin this year. Gordon collided with Santa Maria Island in the eastern Azores early Monday morning. Gordon weakened to a post-tropical cyclone by now thanks to cooler waters, however,

August 21, 2012

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Hurricane Gordon to hit eastern Azores

Portugal's Azores archipelago is bracing for Hurricane Gordon which had intensified to Category 2 and is forecast to hit the eastern-most islands early on Monday.  Additional weakening is forecast but Gordon is still expected to be a hurricane when it passes near or

August 19, 2012

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New tropical wave from Africa on path to become tropical storm

A new tropical wave which came off Africa continues to track through the western Atlantic. It is located about 483 km (300 miles) west of Cape Verde Islands. This wave is producing quite a bit of shower and thunderstorm activity and it has a good chance to become the

August 18, 2012

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Tropical Storm Gordon - 7th named storm of the 2012 Atlantic Hurricane Season

Tropical Storm Gordon formed on Thursday, August 16, 2012 in the middle of the North Atlantic Ocean. It is the 7th named storm of the 2012 Atlantic Hurricane Season. Gordon is moving to the northeast at 16 mph, farther away from US and is not expected to pose any

August 17, 2012

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Ernesto moved to Pacific as Tropical Depression 8E, Gilma no longer a tropical cyclone

Ernesto crossed Mexican high terrain and ended up in the eastern Pacific where it has organized into a tropical depression in the eastern Pacific. A piece of Ernesto developed into Tropical Depression 8-E (TD 8E) after emerging over the warm waters of the eastern

August 12, 2012

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Ernesto dissipates over southern Mexico, may become Hector in Pacific

Ernesto is now tropical rainstorm system and it's slowly dissipating over southern Mexico's mountainous terrain. However, it could still come back to life in eastern Pacific and assume a new identity as Hector. The Pacific Ocean waters west of Manzanillo, Mexico,

August 10, 2012

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Ernesto about to cross the coast of Mexico near Coatzalcos

Ernesto brought strong winds and heavy rains to the southern portion of the Yucatan as it moved inland during the early morning hours on Wednesday, August 8th. Later on Wednesday Ernesto was downgraded to a tropical storm. Cancun, a major tourist destination, about

August 09, 2012

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Tropical Storm Gilma is nearing hurricane strength

On August 7, Tropical Depression 7E had become more organized and has developed into Tropical Storm Gilma; moving through the eastern Pacific Ocean. Tropical Storm Gilma is being steered by a huge elongated area of high pressure that extends from the southwestern

August 08, 2012

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Hurricane Ernesto to make landfall at easthern Yucatan

Hurricane Ernesto is intensifying as it moves toward the eastern Yucatan Peninsula  as Category 1 hurricane. Warm water, lower wind shear and less interaction with the continent of South America, has allowed Ernesto to become a hurricane. Ernesto is expected to

August 08, 2012

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Ernesto to become hurricane; major threat to Honduras, Belize and Mexico

Tropical Storm Ernesto started to gain strength and it is expected to become hurricane tonight. Additional strengthening is possible prior to landfall. Heavy showers and thunderstorms will soak the Cayman Islands through tonight before intensifying and approaching the

August 06, 2012

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Tropical Storm Ernesto on the path for the Caribbean

Tropical Storm Ernesto continues to move westward, impacting the Windward Islands and aims the Caribbean over the weekend.Radar from Guadeloupe and data from a reconnaissance plane indicate that the center of Ernesto will move away from the windward islands and

August 03, 2012

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Fabio weakens and expected to turn northward

Tropical Storm Fabio continues to churn over the open waters of the Eastern Pacific as it tracks toward the northwest into cooler waters which is expected to weaken the tropical cyclone down to depression status. Although the current track keeps Fabio away from land,

July 17, 2012

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Tropical Storm Fabio forms in Eastern Pacific

Tropical Storm Fabio has formed in the east Pacific, near Clipperton Island and it is the sixth named storm of the 2012 Eastern Pacific Hurricane Season. Fabio could take a northward turn by next week. According to US National Hurricane center's latest public

July 13, 2012

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Three storms swirling across Pacific Ocean

Three storm systems are trailing one another across the Pacific Ocean basin. Tropical Storm Daniel is moving west toward Hawaii, followed by Hurricane Emilia. Just off the coast of Mexico, another possible tempest, known as System 98E, is brewing. National Hurricane

July 11, 2012

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Hurricanes Daniel and Emilia continue to move away from land, Daniel aims Hawaii

Tropical storm Daniel strengthened and became the third hurricane over the weekend, and now Tropical Storm Emilia strengthened into the fourth hurricane of the season. Tropical storm Emilia formed on July 7 as tropical depression 5E and became a tropical storm on July

July 10, 2012

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Hurricane Daniel strengthens, two new tropical depressions forming

The tropics are definitely alive in the eastern Pacific with Hurricane Daniel spinning and the formation of two more tropical storms are on the horizon in eastern Pacific.Hurricane Daniel  is currently a category one hurricane. The hurricane is churning over water

July 08, 2012



 



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Tropical Storm Daniel likely to become Pacific hurricane

Tropical Storm Daniel has formed in the eastern Pacific and it shows signs of further strengthening.According to US National Hurricane Center's (NHC) latest public advisory, the center of Tropical Storm Daniel was located near latitude 14.2N and longitude 11.7W and

July 06, 2012

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Tropical Depression 4E near Mexico getting better organized

A new tropical depression formed in the Eastern Pacific Basin along with a second tropical wave which may develop this weekend.  it is expected that this depression will strengthen into Tropical Storm "Daniel" which is the next name on the Eastern Pacific

July 05, 2012

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New tropical storm forming in Eastern Pacific near Mexico

Showers and thunderstorms associated with a Low Pressure Area located about 805 km (500 miles) south of Manzanillo, Mexico, continue to show signs of organization. The system could become a tropical depression at any time according to US National Hurricane Center. This

July 04, 2012

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Tropical Storm Debby made landfall in Florida

National Weather Service doppler radar data indicate that Debby has made landfall near Steinhatchee in Florida. According to National Hurricane Center at 21:00 UTC the center of Tropical storm Debby was located on the coast near latitude 29.5N and longitude 83.4W,

June 26, 2012

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Hurricane storm surge risk in 2012 for US Gulf Coast and Atlantic coast

The 2012 CoreLogic Storm-Surge Report released on June 7, 2012, puts New York, N.Y., at the top of their storm surge risk list with potential hurricane damage that exceeds $168 billion. CoreLogic is a financial, property and consumer information, analytics and

June 21, 2012

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Tropical Storm Chris - Northern Atlantic "Zombie storm"

Tropical Storm Chris, which formed in the northern Atlantic on Tuesday, is acting like a "zombie" storm according to AccuWeather.com. There are few strange things about this spooky storm. Chris does not look like a well-organized tropical system on satellite. The

June 20, 2012

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Tropical Storm Carlotta moving toward Mexico

Tropical storm Carlotta is moving north-northwestward toward the coast of Mexico with rainbands moving into Guatemala and southeastern Mexico. According to latest public advisory by US National Hurricane Center issued at 21:00 UTC the system is located about 500 km

June 15, 2012

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New low pressure system forming south of Mexico

The area of low pressure (INVEST 93) is developing south of Mexico and it is showing signs that it is attempting to organize into a tropical depression. It is located about 1037 km south-southwest of Manzanillo. Disruptive wind shear (strong winds above the

June 10, 2012

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Sea surface temperatures at the start of hurricane season

The official start of hurricane season is June 1, though four named tropical storms in May - Alberto and Beryl in the Atlantic, Aletta and Bud in the Pacific - came little earlier. These early home-grown storms are not necessarily a predictor of the August to October

May 31, 2012

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Weakened slow-moving Beryl producing heavy rains

Tropical storm Beryl had weakened to a tropical depression, but it is still soaking parts of northern Florida and southern Georgia, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) reported. On May 29, 2012 at 21:00 UTC the tropical depression was located about 60 km (40

May 29, 2012

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Beryl has moved over the interior southeastern U.S

As of 21:00 UTC May 28, Tropical Depression Beryl is located about 20 km (10 miles) east of Valdosta, Georgia and about 240 km(150 miles) southwest of Savannah, Georgia. Maximum sustained winds are 25 knots (30 mph, 45 km/h), with stronger gusts. Minimum central

May 28, 2012

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First hurricane of 2012 Pacific season approaches Mexico's coast

Category 2 Hurricane Bud is forecast to weaken before reaching Mexico’s coastline tonight, Friday, May 25, between Manzanillo and Puerto Vallarta. Bud is forecast to be at or near hurricane strength. It is then expected to stall near or on the coast through Saturday

May 25, 2012

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Typhoon Sanvu is the first typhoon this year

Typhoon Sanvu has become the year's first typhoon. It is the first such storm since early October 2011. Sanvu is only the second named western north Pacific storm thus far in 2012. Fortunately, no major land masses are under threat from Sanvu, which will track near

May 24, 2012

Hurricane BUD may 24 2012

Category One Hurricane BUD continues to strenghten

Tropical Storm Bud continues to quickly strengthen and now is categorized as Category One Hurricane. Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 35 km (25 miles) from the center and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 185 km (115 miles). Estimated minimum

May 24, 2012

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New modification of Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale

The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale (SSHWS) is undergoing a minor modification in 2012 to resolve "awkwardness" associated with conversions among the various units used for wind speed in advisory products. The new modification is to help clarify categorization

March 13, 2012

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Powerful storm lashed UK, heading toward Scandinavia

Hurricane gusts blasted Scotland on Thursday as a fearsome wintry storm motored through the United Kingdom. The windstorm also reached southward into England, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. The strong storm - the worst in the UK for a decade - brought

December 10, 2011

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2011: Fourteen billion-dollar weather disasters, most in U.S. history

Through August, the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) estimated that ten weather disasters costing at least $1 billion had hit the U.S., at total cost of up to $45 billion. However, the October 29 snow storm brings us up to eleven billion-dollar disasters. Flood

December 01, 2011



 


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Hurricane Kenneth became a major category 4 storm

Hurricane Kenneth became a major category4 storm off the Pacific coast of Mexico early Tuesday but posed no immediate threat to land. Hurricane Kenneth, which gained monster Category 4 status, is the strongest hurricane ever so late in the season for the basin. No

November 23, 2011

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Rare November hurricane Kenneth formed south of Mexico

Hurricane Kenneth has formed in the eastern Pacific Ocean, a rare feat for this time of year. Officialy the hurricane season ends on November 30.  Tropical Depression 13-E took shape Saturday afternoon and strengthened into Tropical Storm Kenneth about 24 hours

November 22, 2011

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"Historic" Bering Sea Storm slamming Alaska coast with hurricane power

The historic Bering Sea storm everyone's been talking about since Tuesday has begun to batter the coast of western Alaska, with the Bering Strait, Seward Peninsula, Norton Sound and Yukon Delta areas expected to take the brunt of it. Current forescasts expect the storm

November 10, 2011

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Bering Sea Superstorm - Rising sea expected to cause widespread erosion and flooding along western Alaska coast

Referred to as the “Bering Sea Superstorm” by the National Weather Service Office in Fairbanks (NWS), damaging winds, severe beach erosion and major coastal flooding are expected. In some locations, heavy snow and blizzard conditions are also

November 09, 2011

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Hurricane Rina downgraded to a tropical storm

Rina remains still poses dangers as it encounters the Yucatan Peninsula through tonight. Rina was on the verge of becoming a major hurricane (Category 3 strength or greater) Wednesday morning, but has since dramatically weakened due to upwelling (rough seas bringing

October 28, 2011

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Hurricane Rina weakens, heads for Cancun and Cozumel

Hurricane Rina is on a collision course with Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula by tomorrow, but its prospects to remain organize after tomorrow seem bleak. Latest wind data taken from Rina indicates that the storm has weakened to a Category 1 hurricane with winds of 85

October 26, 2011

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Tropical depression forms east of southern Philippines

Tropical Depression 23 (T.D. 23W) has formed east of southern Philippines as of Monday, and the tropical weather system is set to track across the island nation with heavy rain and gusty winds during the next few days.Torrential rainfall, flooding and landslides will

October 11, 2011

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Hurricane Jova could become Category 4 hurricane

On October 6, 2011, a tropical depression over the eastern Pacific Ocean strengthened into Tropical Storm Jova. On October 8, Jova became a hurricane. By 11:00 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time (PDT) on October 10, 2011, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) reported, Jova

October 11, 2011

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Hurricanes Irwin and Jova moving in Eastern Pacific, heading toward Mexico

Irwin became the eighth hurricane of the eastern pacific season early Friday morning, and could be quickly followed by Jova on Saturday, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC)....IRWIN MOVING SLOWLY WEST-NORTHWESTWARD...LITTLE CHANGE IN STRENGTH DURING

October 08, 2011

Close up GOES satellite view of Philippe on Friday morning

Hurricane Philippe Forms In The Atlantic, weakening into tropical storm

 Philippe is the sixteenth named storm of the 2011 Atlantic hurricane season, following Hurricane Ophelia which brought strong winds to Ireland and Britain on Thursday. Hurricane Philippe is expected to weaken and become post-tropical during the weekend as it

October 07, 2011

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Ophelia weakens to a tropical storm as it races toward the Avalon peninsula of Newfoundland

Ophelia was strengthening into a hurricane when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this natural-color image on September 29, 2011. MODIS acquired this image at 10:40 a.m. Atlantic Standard Time (AST). Twenty

October 03, 2011

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Typhoon Nalgae (22W) approaching the Philippines

Typhoon Nalgae, known in the Philippines as Quiel, was approaching the archipelago on September 30, 2011 when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra satellite passed over the region and captured this true-color image.Residents

October 02, 2011

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Maria becomes third hurricane of 2011 season

Maria, the 13th named storm of the season, has sustained winds of 75 mph (120 kph), just above the hurricane-strength threshold. The storm is currently on a latitude about level with North Carolina and is spinning some 205 miles (330 kilometers) north-northwest of

September 16, 2011

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Former Hurricane Katia hits the U.K.

The Met Office has issued a yellow severe weather warning today for the north of England, Northern Ireland and Scotland before the winds die down tomorrow. The gales, the tail-end of Hurricane Katia, hit Britain yesterday morning, bringing the worst storms since the

September 13, 2011

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How a hurricane impacts the ocean

Hurricanes have marked effects not just on land, but also on coastal waters. Their high winds mix ocean water, bringing nutrients to the surface at a time when warm summer waters are often nutrient-depleted. The nutrients spur algae to grow, creating large blooms of

September 09, 2011

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Could Hurricane Katia reach Northern Europe

Tropical cyclones are formed mostly between 10 and 30 degrees north and south, but it happens sometimes that they make the trip north to us.According to longrange computer models, Katia could be the most powerful storm to hit the UK in over 300 years! One of the

September 07, 2011

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Lee spawns mass tornadoes touchdown from Mississippi to Georgia, floods, wildfires across Texas

Flooding isn't the only threat Tropical Rainstorm Lee brings to the Southeast. Tornadoes have been touching down from Mississippi to Alabama, Georgia and Florida, and more are likely to be spawned across the Southeast through Tuesday.The area at greatest risk today

September 06, 2011



 




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Tropical Storm "Lee" drenches Louisiana

Tropical Storm Lee lurched toward the US Gulf Coast on Saturday, dumping heavy rain on Louisiana and threatening extensive flooding that will put the New Orleans levee system to the test. Oil companies evacuated workers from offshore rigs ahead of the arrival of...

September 04, 2011

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Tropical storm Katia could be next major hurricane

While much of the mid-Atlantic and New England continues to suffer from residual flooding and power outages in the wake of Irene, a new storm in the Atlantic bears some watching.Katia became a tropical storm early Tuesday morning after first forming as a tropical

August 31, 2011

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New York avoids worst of Hurricane Irene that moves on toward Eastern Canada

Downgraded a notch to a Category 1 storm, Hurricane Irene made landfall on the Outer Banks of North Carolina just after dawn Saturday. Residents up and down the East Coast are now dealing with Irene’s aftermath. Tropical Storm Irene swept through the desolate

August 29, 2011

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Hurricane Irene makes landfall

Irene is a category 1 Hurricane with sustained winds of 85 m.p.h. Its effects so far have included 4 deaths in North Carolina, hundreds of trees uprooted, power outages, and structural damage. Structural damage, though minor so far in most places, has also been of a

August 27, 2011

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Hurricane Irene bears down on East Coast

Irene left the Bahamas and began its push toward the Eastern Seaboard overnight. Parts of coastal South Carolina and North Carolina are already beginning to feel the effects of the storm, with power even out in one South Carolina coastal town.Millions of people on

August 26, 2011

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Hurricane Irene targets East Cost as it gains power

Hurricane Irene, the first hurricane of the 2011 Atlantic season, has now organized itself into a major storm and is barreling northward toward the United States' eastern coastline. Several factors have contributed to the growing strength of the storm, now a Category

August 25, 2011

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Atlantic heat source for Hurricane Irene

As Hurricane Irene rumbles through the Atlantic Ocean, it needs fuel to sustain itself. Warm water is the main fuel, and there is plenty of it right now, as there usually is this time of year. The map above shows sea surface temperatures (SST) in the Atlantic...

August 25, 2011

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Irene seen by TRMM and MODIS satellites strengthnening into Category 1 hurricane

Irene formed as a tropical storm east of the Leeward Islands on August 20, 2011. By August 22, the storm had strengthened to a Category 1 hurricane. At 2:00 p.m. Atlantic Standard Time on August 22, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) reported that Irene had

August 23, 2011

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Irene could strengthen into a most dangerous hurricane in decade

Irene is projected to become the strongest hurricane to hit the Carolinas since 1996 this weekend. Six years have passed since the entire United States endured a blow like Irene is forecast to unleash. The AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center is expecting Irene to blast

August 23, 2011

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Tropical Storm Harvey bears down on Belize

Tropical Storm Harvey made landfall on Belize on Saturday, but forecasters said it was expected to fizzle out after dumping heavy rains over Central America.The eye of the storm made landfall near Dangriga and weakened as it moved farther inland. It was moving

August 21, 2011

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Tropical Depression Eight becoming Tropical Storm "Harvey"

Tropical Depression 8 could continue to intensify into Tropical Storm "Harvey" by tonight if it remains over the warm waters of the northwestern Caribbean, just north of Honduras. The later landfall occurs, the stronger the tropical system and its winds...

August 19, 2011

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4 low-pressure systems form in Atlantic ocean

Four areas in the Atlantic Ocean showing signs of potential tropical development and three of those systems now have a “medium chance” of soon growing into a tropical cyclone. One of those areas is a low pressure system centered more than 1,100 miles east of the

August 12, 2011

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NOAA increases predicted number of named storms

The following is a release from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration(NOAA) on Aug. 4, 2011."NOAA issued its updated 2011 Atlantic hurricane season outlook today, raising the number of expected named storms from its pre-season outlook issued in May.

August 06, 2011

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Hurricane Eugene gains power

Hurricane Eugene has become a large hurricane in size and strength, and when NOAA's GOES-11 satellite captured an image of the eastern Pacific on August 2, Hurricane Eugene was very obvious because of its size.Although an eye was not visible in the image, Eugene is a

August 03, 2011

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Tropical low pressure system organises east of Lesser Antilles

A new system in the Atlantic is likely to be the next tropical system of concern and it could cause big problems over the Antilles next week. A strong tropical wave is cruising westward across the central Atlantic Basin this weekend, and the early indications are that

July 31, 2011

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Tropical storm Don has formed near the Yucatan; heading to Texas

The strong tropical wave that emerged off the coast of Africa over a week ago has become the next named system in the Atlantic Basin while taking a path toward Texas. With the system away from Cuba, slowing its forward speed over the deep warm water of the northwestern

July 27, 2011

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Tropical Storm Juaning (Nock-Ten) slams Philippines; heading toward South China

A slow moving tropical storm battered the Philippines on Wednesday, leaving 27 dead and over 60 injured or missing, according to a government disaster response agency. The country's National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council began rescuing stranded people

July 27, 2011



 




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Hurricane Dora, tropical storm Cindy and tropical storm Bret forecast to weaken

Less than 24 hours ago, Dora had maximum winds of 155 mph, which is a borderline Category 5 hurricane. Since then, the storm has weakened to become a Category 1 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 85 mph. Dora is forecast to weaken to a tropical storm this

July 23, 2011

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Hurricanes most vulnerable US cities

When Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and other areas of the Gulf Coast five years ago this week, becoming the most economically destructive storm in history, it highlighted our vulnerability to the forces of Mother Nature.Today a number of U.S. cities

July 23, 2011

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Hurricane Dora becoming Category 5 hurricane

By 8:00 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time on July 21, 2011, Dora was nearly a Category 5 hurricane. The U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) reported that Dora had maximum sustained winds of 155 miles (250 kilometers) per hour with higher gusts. At that time, the NHC stated,

July 22, 2011

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Powerful hurricane Dora could impact Baja California

Dora, expected to strengthen to a major hurricane, will impact parts of western Mexico over the next few days with heavy surf and locally strong, gusty winds. Churning about 250 miles southwest of Acapulco over the eastern Pacific, Dora will continue to strengthen,

July 21, 2011

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Tropical storm Cindy forms over Atlantic Ocean

Tropical Storm Cindy has formed in the Atlantic Ocean. This storm will remain out in the middle of the water, and is not expected to come near shore. It will remain a tropical storm over the next few days and most likely dissipate on Friday.Cindy is the third

July 21, 2011

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Category 1 Ma-on strikes Japan

On July 19, 2100 UTC, Ma-on was approximately 260 nautical miles west-southwest of Yokosuka, Japan (near latitude 33.6N and longitude 134.8E) and moving east-northeast at 6 knots. In the next 12-24 hours, Ma-on is expected to steer away from Honshu and eventually

July 20, 2011

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Tropical storm Dora becomes 4th Pacific hurricane of the season

Tropical storm Dora, the fourth named storm of the Pacific hurricane season, strengthened off the coast of Central America on Monday. The storm, with winds of about 95 kph, could reach hurricane strength on Tuesday but is not forecast to make a direct hit on land and

July 19, 2011

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Tropical storm Bret stirs bigger waves

   The AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center has the latest stats on Tropical Storm Bret.Strong northeasterly winds over the Eastern Seaboard of the U.S. will steer Bret even farther to the northeast away from the northern Bahamas, protecting the

July 19, 2011

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Typhoon Ma-on expected to slam into south Japan next week

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) reports this morning that Ma-on, about 655 miles east-southeast of Iwo-Jima, has shown “steadily improving organization” over the past six hours, with convection “consolidating around the core” and the emergence of an

July 13, 2011

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Tropical Storm Calvin becomes third named storm in the Eastern Pacific

Tropical Storm Calvin, the third named storm of this year’s eastern Pacific hurricane season, gained strength off Mexico’s west coast while the U.S. National Hurricane Center monitored another system in the Atlantic. Calvin, which formed yesterday, was about 345

July 08, 2011

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Tropical Storm Arlene drenches eastern Mexico

Strong wind and heavy rain lashed much of eastern Mexico Thursday as Tropical Storm Arlene made landfall at near hurricane strength, whipping up Gulf waves large enough to force area ports to shut down. Ports in Veracruz state were closed due to waves reaching six

July 01, 2011

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First named tropical storm of the season forms near Gulf of Mexico

The first tropical storm of 2011 has formed near the Gulf of Mexico, nearly one month into the Atlantic hurricane season.Tropical Storm Arlene is on a collision course for Mexico. The storm took its time showing up, though, becoming the first named storm

June 30, 2011

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Tropical storm Beatriz caused flooding and destruction in Acapulco area

Hurricane Beatriz brushed Mexico's resort-studded Pacific coast with powerful rains and winds early Tuesday, flooding streets as tourists hunkered down in hotels. Authorities closed the ports of Acapulco, Manzanillo and Zihuatanejo and urged hotel owners to tell

June 22, 2011

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Typhoon Meari gaining strenght

Meari could unleash flooding rain and damaging winds as it takes aim at the Far East late in the week.Meari was named by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) Wednesday, as Tropical Depression 07W gained storm status over the warm seas east of the northern

June 22, 2011

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Tropical depression SIX-W (06W) forming near Hong Kong coast, Beatriz speeds up

Two tropical storms are brewing in the Northwest Pacific and East Pacific basins; Tropical Storm Beatriz, in the East Pacific Basin near Lazaro Cardenas, Mexico is likely to become a category 1 hurricane later today, June 20. Beatriz is likely to track close

June 21, 2011

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Low pressure system moving NE between Iceland and the British Isles

SAT24  A vigorous area of low pressure looks set to develop south of Ireland on Friday. This is going to be pushing cloud and rain into Ireland, Wales andsouthwest England through the morning, some of it heavy at times. The rain affects much of

June 15, 2011

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Frequent tornadoes a symptom of jet stream change

The unusually large number of severe tornadoes this year may be a sign of large-scale changes in the jet stream. When the events happen frequently such as the destruction of Joplin, Mo., the outbreak of multiple tornadoes in Alabama, and the northeast outbreak in...

June 05, 2011



 



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Caribbean could turn active entering into 2011 Atlantic Hurricane season

The 2011 Atlantic Hurricane Season officially starts on Wednesday and it is possible that the tropics will turn active immediately in the Caribbean. The latest computer models continue to indicate the formation of an area of low pressure in the southwestern or

May 31, 2011

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This hurricane season may see 12 to 18 named storms and 6 to 10 hurricanes

The 2011 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook could be an above-normal year for activity, according to the forecast from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.This hurricane season may see 12 to 18 named storms and six to 10 hurricanes, according to

May 22, 2011

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Hurricane season starts today in Eastern Pacific

May 15th marks the official start of the 2011 hurricane season in the Eastern Pacific, a season which is expected to exceed the amount of named tropical systems from last year by twofold. AccuWeather.com meteorologists are predicting an average number of tropical

May 15, 2011

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Multiple vortex forming over Northern America

There is an upper level low pressure system vortex storm forming of East Coast of US. It's an occluded front with a low pressure of 29.29hg or 992mb. The winds are rotating the system counterclockwise. In previous post we gave some possible explanation of the situation

May 11, 2011

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Counterclockwise hurricane forming in Atlantic

The Hurricane Atlantic Satellite image shows clouds by their temperature over the Atlantic Ocean. Red and blue areas indicate cold (high) cloud tops.Atlantic VIS LoopCoriolis effect In physics, the Coriolis effect is an apparent deflection of moving objects

May 09, 2011

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2011 Atlantic Hurricane Season will be active, have more US landfalls

AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center meteorologists are predicting an active season for 2011 with more impact on the U.S. coastline than last year. The team is forecasting a total of 15 named tropical storms, 8 of which will attain hurricane status and 3 of which will

April 03, 2011

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Rare Southern Atlantic sub-tropical storm forms

NASA's Aqua satellite spotted some strong convection in a recently formed low pressure area that strengthened into Sub-Tropical Storm Arani in the South Atlantic. Arani formed near the coast of Brazil and is now moving away from it. Tropical cyclones in the Atlantic

March 16, 2011



 

Hurricanes in History



Galveston Hurricane 1900
Click for a larger map of the Galveston 1900 HurricaneThis killer weather system was first detected over the tropical Atlantic on August 27. While the history of the track and intensity is not fully known, the system reached Cuba as a tropical storm on September 3 and moved into the southeastern Gulf of Mexico on the 5th. A general west-northwestward motion occurred over the Gulf accompanied by rapid intensification. By the time the storm reached the Texas coast south of Galveston late on September 8, it was a Category 4 hurricane. After landfall, the cyclone turned northward through the Great Plains. It became extratropical and turned east-northeastward on September 11, passing across the Great Lakes, New England, and southeastern Canada. It was last spotted over the north Atlantic on September 15.

This hurricane was the deadliest weather disaster in United States history. Storm tides of 8 to 15 ft inundated the whole of Galveston Island, as well as other portions of the nearby Texas coast. These tides were largely responsible for the 8,000 deaths (estimates range from 6,000 to 12,000) attributed to the storm. The damage to property was estimated at $30 million...

For an interactive map of the Galveston Hurricane visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Atlantic-Gulf Hurricane 1919
Click for a larger map of the Atlantic-Gulf Hurricane of 1919This fearsome cyclone was first detected near the Lesser Antilles on September 2. It moved generally west-northwestward for several days, passing near the Dominican Republic on September 4 and into the southeastern Bahamas on the 5th and 6th. At that time it became a hurricane. A westward turn on September 7 took the center across the central Bahamas on the 7th and 8th and into the Straits of Florida on the 9th. The now large hurricane was of Category 4 intensity as the eye passed just south of Key West, Florida and the Dry Tortugas on September 10. A continued west to west-northwestward motion brought the center to the Texas coast south of Corpus Christi as a Category 3 hurricane on September 14. The cyclone dissipated over northern Mexico and southern Texas the next day.

Although hurricane-force winds occurred over the Florida Keys and the central and south Texas coast, no reliable wind measurements are available from near the center. A storm surge of up to 12 ft inundated Corpus Christi, Texas causing major damage to the coastal areas. A ship moored near the Dry Tortugas measured a pressure of 27.37 inches as the center passed, and based on this, the storm is ranked as the third most intense to hit the United States.

The death toll was estimated at 600 to 900 people. Of these, more than 500 were lost on ten ships that either sunk or were reported missing. Damage in the United States was estimated at $22 million.

For an interactive map of the Atlantic-Gulf Hurricane visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Great Miami Hurricane 1926
Click for a larger map of the Great Miami Hurricane of 1926
The "Great Miami" Hurricane was first spotted as a tropical wave located 1,000 miles east of the Lesser Antilles on September 11th. The system moved quickly westward and intensified to hurricane strength as it moved to the north of Puerto Rico on the 15th. Winds were reported to be nearly 150 mph as the hurricane passed over the Turks Islands on the 16th and through the Bahamas on the 17th. Little in the way of meteorological information on the approaching hurricane was available to the Weather Bureau in Miami. As a result, hurricane warnings were not issued until midnight on September 18th, which gave the booming population of South Florida little notice of the impending disaster.

The Category 4 hurricane's eye moved directly over Miami Beach and downtown Miami during the morning hours of the 18th. This cyclone produced the highest sustained winds ever recorded in the United States at the time, and the barometric pressure fell to 27.61 inches as the eye passed over Miami. A storm surge of nearly 15 feet was reported in Coconut Grove. Many casualties resulted as people ventured outdoors during the half-hour lull in the storm as the eye passed overhead. Most residents, having not experienced a hurricane, believed that the storm had passed during the lull. They were suddenly trapped and exposed to the eastern half of the hurricane shortly thereafter. Every building in the downtown district of Miami was damaged or destroyed. The town of Moore Haven on the south side of Lake Okeechobee was completely flooded by lake surge from the hurricane. Hundreds of people in Moore Haven alone were killed by this surge, which left behind floodwaters in the town for weeks afterward.

The hurricane continued northwestward across the Gulf of Mexico and approached Pensacola on September 20th. The storm nearly stalled to the south of Pensacola later that day and buffeted the central Gulf Coast with 24 hours of heavy rainfall, hurricane force winds, and storm surge. The hurricane weakened as it moved inland over Louisiana later on the 21st. Nearly every pier, warehouse, and vessel on Pensacola Bay was destroyed.
The great hurricane of 1926 ended the economic boom in South Florida and would be a $90 billion disaster had it occurred in recent times. With a highly transient population across southeastern Florida during the 1920s, the death toll is uncertain since more than 800 people were missing in the aftermath of the cyclone. A Red Cross report lists 373 deaths and 6,381 injuries as a result of the hurricane.

For an interactive map of the Great Miami Hurricane visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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San Felipe-Okeechobee Hurricane 1928
Click for a larger map of the San Felipe-Okeechobee Hurricane of 1928This classic Cape Verde hurricane was first detected over the tropical Atlantic on September 10, although it likely formed several days earlier. It moved westward through the Leeward Islands on the 12th. It then turned west-northwestward, scoring a direct hit on Puerto Rico on the 13th (the feast of San Felipe) as a Category 4 hurricane. The hurricane continued west-northwestward through the Bahamas and made landfall near Palm Beach, Florida on September 16. It turned north-northeastward over the Florida Peninsula on the 17th, a motion which brought the remains of the storm to eastern North Carolina on the 19th. It then turned northward and merged with a non-tropical low over the eastern Great Lakes on September 20.

No reliable wind readings are available from near the landfall area in Florida. However, Palm Beach reported a minimum pressure of 27.43 in, making this the fourth strongest hurricane of record to hit the United States. In Puerto Rico, San Juan reported 144 mph sustained winds, while Guayama reported a pressure of 27.65 inches. Additionally, a ship just south of St. Croix, United States Virgin Islands (USVI) reported a pressure of 27.50 inches, while Guadeloupe in the Leeward Islands reported a pressure of 27.76 inches.

This hurricane caused heavy casualties and extensive destruction along its path from the Leeward Islands to Florida. The worst tragedy occurred at inland Lake Okeechobee in Florida, where the hurricane caused a lake surge of 6 to 9 ft that inundated the surrounding area. 1,836 people died in Florida, mainly due to the lake surge. An additional 312 people died in Puerto Rico, and 18 more were reported dead in the Bahamas. Damage to property was estimated at $50,000,000 in Puerto Rico and $25,000,000 in Florida.

For an interactive map of the San Felipe-Okeechobee Hurricane visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Florida Keys Labor Day Hurricane 1935
Click for a larger map of the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935This system was first detected east of the central Bahamas on August 29. Moving westward, it passed near Andros Island on September 1, at which time it reached hurricane strength and turned west-northwestward. Phenomenal strengthening then occurred, and when the storm reached the middle Florida Keys on September 2, it was a Category 5 hurricane. After roaring through the Keys, the hurricane turned gradually northward almost parallel to the Florida west coast until it again made landfall near Cedar Key as a Category 2 hurricane on the 4th. A northeastward motion took the storm across the southeastern United States to the Atlantic coast near Norfolk, Virgina on September 6. It continued into the Atlantic, becoming extratropical on the 7th and last being detected on the 10th.

No wind measurements are available from the core of this small, but vicious hurricane. A pressure of 26.35 inches measured at Long Key, Florida makes this the most intense hurricane of record to hit the United States and the third most intense hurricane of record in the Atlantic basin (surpassed only by the 26.05 inches in Hurricane Wilma in 2005 and 26.22 inches observed in Hurricane Gilbert in 1988).

The combination of winds and tides were responsible for 408 deaths in the Florida Keys, primarily among World War I veterans working in the area. Damage in the United States was estimated at $6 million.

For an interactive map of the Labor Day Hurricane visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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New England Hurricane 1938
Click for a larger map of the New England Hurricane of 1938The "Long Island Express" was first detected over the tropical Atlantic on September 13, although it may have formed a few days earlier. Moving generally west-northwestward, it passed to the north of Puerto Rico on the 18th and 19th, likely as a category 5 hurricane. It turned northward on September 20 and by the morning of the 21st it was 100 to 150 miles east of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. At that point, the hurricane accelerated to a forward motion of 60 to 70 mph, making landfall over Long Island and Connecticut that afternoon as a Category 3 hurricane. The storm became extratropical after landfall and dissipated over southeastern Canada on September 22.

Blue Hill Observatory, Massachusetts measured sustained winds of 121 mph with gusts to 183 mph (likely influenced by terrain). A U.S. Coast Guard station on Long Island measured a minimum pressure of 27.94 in. Storm surges of 10 to 12 ft inundated portions of the coast from Long Island and Connecticut eastward to southeastern Massachusetts, with the most notable surges in Narragansett Bay and Buzzards Bay. Heavy rains before and during the hurricane produced river flooding, most notably along the Connecticut River.

This hurricane struck with little warning and was responsible for 600 deaths and $308 million in damage in the United States.

For an interactive map of the New England Hurricane visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Great Atlantic Hurricane 1944
Click for a larger map of the Great Atlantic Hurricane of 1944This large and powerful hurricane was first detected northeast of the Leeward Islands on September 9. It moved west-northwestward through the 12th, then turned northward on a track that brought the center near Cape Hatteras, North Carolina on the 14th. The cyclone accelerated north-northeastward, moving across eastern New England and into Canada by September 15. The storm became extratropical over Canada and finally merged with a larger low near Greenland on September 16. This hurricane was of Category 3 intensity at landfalls at Cape Hatteras, Long Island, and Point Judith, Rhode Island, and Category 2 as far north as the coast of Maine.

Cape Henry, VA reported 134 mph sustained winds (measured 90 ft above the ground) with estimated gusts to 150 mph. Widespread hurricane-force winds were reported elsewhere along the storm track from North Carolina to Massachusetts with a maximum reported gust of 109 mph at Hartford, Connecticut. Rainfall totals of 6 to 11 inches accompanied the storm.

While this hurricane caused 46 deaths and $100 million in damage in the United States, the worst effects occurred at sea where it wreaked havoc on World War II shipping. Five ships, including a U. S. Navy destroyer and minesweeper, two U. S. Coast Guard cutters, and a light vessel, sank due to the storm causing 344 deaths.

For an interactive map of the Great Atlantic Hurricane visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricanes Carol and Edna 1954
Click for a larger map of Hurricane Carol 1954 Click for a larger map of Hurricane Edna 1954Carol formed near the central Bahama Islands on August 25, and moved slowly northward and north-northwestward. By August 30 it was a hurricane about 100-150 miles east of Charleston, South Carolina. It then accelerated north-northeastward, make landfall as a Category 3 hurricane over Long Island, New York and Connecticut on the 31st. The cyclone became extratropical later that day as it crossed the remainder of New England and southeastern Canada.

Sustained winds of 80 to 100 mph were reported over much of eastern Connecticut, all of Rhode Island, and eastern Massachusetts. A peak gust of 130 mph was reported at Block Island, Rhode Island, while gusts of 100 to 125 mph occurred over much of the rest of the affected area. Storm surge flooding occurred along the New England coast from Long Island northward, with water depths of 8 to 10 ft reported in downtown Providence, Rhode Island. Carol was responsible for 60 deaths and $461 million in damage in the United States.

No discussion of Carol is complete without mention of the remarkably similar Hurricane Edna. This storm first formed east of the Windward Islands on September 2. It moved northwestward, and by September 7 it was a hurricane very near where Carol had formed two weeks before. From this point, Edna followed a path just east of Carol's. It accelerated past Cape Hatteras, North Carolina on September 10 and made landfall over Cape Cod as a Category 3 hurricane the next day. Edna moved across Maine into eastern Canada later on the 11th as it became extratropical.

Martha's Vinyard, Massachusetts reported a peak wind gust of 120 mph during Edna, and much of the rest of the affected area had gusts of 80 to 100 mph. The storm was responsible for 20 deaths and $40 million in damage in the United States.

For an interactive map of Hurricanes Carol and Edna visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.


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Hurricane Hazel 1954
Click for a larger map of Hurricane Hazel 1954Hazel was first spotted east of the Windward Islands on October 5. It moved through the islands later that day as a hurricane, then it moved westward over the southern Caribbean Sea through October 8. A slow turn to the north-northeast occurred from October 9-12, with Hazel crossing western Haiti as a hurricane on the 12th. The hurricane turned northward and crossed the southeastern Bahamas on the 13th, followed by a northwestward turn on the 14th. Hazel turned north and accelerated on October 15, making landfall as a Category 4 hurricane near the North Carolina-South Carolina border. Subsequent rapid motion over the next 12 hours took the storm from the coast across the eastern United States into southeastern Canada as it became extratropical.

High winds occurred over large portions of the eastern United States. Myrtle Beach, South Carolina reported a peak wind gust of 106 mph, and winds were estimated at 130 to 150 mph along the coast between Myrtle Beach and Cape Fear, North Carolina. Washington, DC reported 78 mph sustained winds, and peak gusts of over 90 mph occurred as far northward as inland New York state. A storm surge of up to 18 ft inundated portions of the North Carolina coast. Heavy rains of up to 11 inches occurred as far northward as Toronto, Canada resulting in severe flooding.

Hazel was responsible for 95 deaths and $281 million in damage in the United States, 100 deaths and $100 million in damage in Canada, and an estimated 400 to 1000 deaths in Haiti.

For an interactive map of Hurricane Hazel visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricanes Connie and Diane 1955
Click for a larger map of Hurricane Connie 1955 Click for a larger map of Hurricane Diane 1955Click for a larger Radar image of ConnieThese two hurricanes must be mentioned together. They struck the North Carolina coast only five days apart, and the rains from Connie set the stage for the devastating floods caused by Diane.

Connie was first detected as a tropical storm over the tropical Atlantic on August 3. It moved just north of west for several days, reaching hurricane strength several hundred miles northeast of the Leeward Islands on the 5th. After passing north of the Leewards on the 6th, Connie turned northwestward - a motion that continued until the 10th. An erratic, generally north-northwestward motion then brought Connie to the North Carolina coast on August 12 as a Category 3 hurricane. This was followed by a gradual northwestward turn through August 14, when Connie dissipated over the eastern Great Lakes.

Fort Macon, North Carolina reported 75 mph sustained winds with gusts to 100 mph, while a storm surge of up to 8 ft occurred along the coast. There were no reported deaths and the damage in the United States was $40 million. However, the most significant aspect of Connie was the rainfall of up to 12 inches that affected the northeastern United States.

Diane was first detected over the tropical Atlantic on August 7. Moving generally west-northwestward, the cyclone became a tropical storm on the 9th. Diane became a hurricane on August 11, by which time it was moving northwestward. A northward turn occurred on the 12th, followed by a westward turn on the 13th and a west-northwestward motion on the 14th. This motion brought Diane to the North Carolina coast on August 17 as a Category 1 hurricane. The storm turned northward across Virginia, then it turned northeastward and moved back into the Atlantic near Long Island, New York on August 19. Diane became extratropical over the North Atlantic on the 21st.

Hurricane conditions affected only a small part of the North Carolina coast, and the damage from winds and tides was relatively minor. The main impact was heavy rains. Diane poured 10 to 20 inches of rain on areas soaked by Connie just a few days before, producing widespread severe flooding from North Carolina to Massachusetts. The floods were responsible were 184 deaths and $832 million in damage.

For an interactive map of Hurricanes Connie and Diane visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Audrey 1957
Click for a larger map of Hurricane Audrey 1957Audrey was first detected over the southwestern Gulf of Mexico on June 24. It moved slowly northward as it became a tropical storm and a hurricane the next day. A faster northward motion brought the center to the coast near the Texas-Louisiana border on the 27th. Rapid strengthening in the last six hours before landfall meant Audrey made landfall as a Category 4 hurricane. The cyclone turned northeastward after landfall, becoming extratropical over northern Mississippi on June 28 and merging with another low over the Great Lakes the next day. The combined system was responsible for strong winds and heavy rains over portions of the eastern United States and Canada.

No reliable wind or pressure measurements are available from Audrey's core at landfall. The main impact was from 8 to 12 ft storm surges that penetrated as far inland as 25 miles over portions of low-lying southwestern Louisiana. These surges were responsible for the vast majority of the 390 deaths from Audrey. Damage in the United States was estimated at $150 million.

For an interactive map of Hurricane Audrey visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Donna 1960
Click for a larger map of Hurricane Donna 1960Click here to see a bigger radar image of Donna.One of the all-time great hurricanes, Donna was first detected as a tropical wave moving off the African coast on August 29. It became a tropical storm over the tropical Atlantic the next day and a hurricane on September 1. Donna followed a general west-northwestward track for the following five days, passing over the northern Leeward Islands on the 4th and 5th as a Category 4 hurricane and then to the north of Puerto Rico later on the 5th. Donna turned westward on September 7 and passed through the southeastern Bahamas. A northwestward turn on the 9th brought the hurricane to the middle Florida Keys the next day at Category 4 intensity. Donna then curved northeastward, crossing the Florida Peninsula on September 11, followed by eastern North Carolina (Category 3) on the 12th, and the New England states (Category 3 on Long Island and Categories 1 to 2 elsewhere) on the 12th and 13th. The storm became extratropical over eastern Canada on the 13th.

Donna is the only hurricane of record to produce hurricane-force winds in Florida, the Mid-Atlantic states, and New England. Sombrero Key, Florida reported 128 mph sustained winds with gusts to 150 mph. In the Mid-Atlantic states, Elizabeth City, North Carolina reported 83 mph sustained winds, while Manteo, North Carolina reported a 120 mph gust. In New England, Block Island, Rhode Island reported 95 mph sustained winds with gusts to 130 mph.

Donna caused storm surges of up to 13 ft in the Florida Keys and 11 ft surges along the southwest coast of Florida. Four to eight ft surges were reported along portions of the North Carolina coast, with 5 to 10 ft surges along portions of the New England coast. Heavy rainfalls of 10 to 15 inches occurred in Puerto Rico, 6 to 12 inches in Florida, and 4 to 8 inches elsewhere along the path of the hurricane.

The landfall pressure of 27.46 inches makes Donna the fifth strongest hurricane of record to hit the United States. It was responsible for 50 deaths in the United States. One hundred and fourteen deaths were reported from the Leeward Islands to the Bahamas, including 107 in Puerto Rico caused by flooding from the heavy rains. The hurricane caused $387 million in damage in the United States and $13 million elsewhere along its path.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Donna.

For an interactive map of Hurricane Donna visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Camille 1969
Click for a larger map of Hurricane Camille 1969 Click here for a larger image of CamilleThis powerful, deadly, and destructive hurricane formed just west of the Cayman Islands on August 14. It rapidly intensified and by the time it reached western Cuba the next day it was a Category 3 hurricane. Camille tracked north-northwestward across the Gulf of Mexico and became a Category 5 hurricane on August 16. The hurricane maintained this intensity until it made landfall along the Mississippi coast late on the 17th. Camille weakened to a tropical depression as it crossed Mississippi into western Tennessee and Kentucky, then it turned eastward across West Virginia and Virginia. The cyclone moved into the Atlantic on August 20 and regained tropical storm strength before becoming extratropical on the 22nd.

A minimum pressure of 26.84 inches was reported in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, which makes Camille the second most intense hurricane of record to hit the United States. The actual maximum sustained winds will never be known, as the hurricane destroyed all the wind-recording instruments in the landfall area. The estimates at the coast are near 200 mph. Columbia, Mississippi, located 75 miles inland, reported 120 mph sustained winds. A storm tide of 24.6 ft occurred at Pass Christian, Mississippi. The heaviest rains along the Gulf Coast were about 10 inches. However, as Camille passed over the Virginias, it produced a burst of 12 to 20 inch rains with local totals of up to 31 inches. Most of this rain occurred in 3 to 5 hours and caused catastrophic flash flooding.

The combination of winds, surges, and rainfalls caused 256 deaths (143 on the Gulf Coast and 113 in the Virginia floods) and $1.421 billion in damage. Three deaths were reported in Cuba.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Camille.

For an interactive map of Hurricane Camille visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Agnes 1972
Click for a larger map of Hurricane Agnes 1972 Click here for a larger image of Agnes The large disturbance that became Agnes was first detected over the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico on June 14. The system drifted eastward and became a tropical depression later that day and a tropical storm over the northwestern Caribbean on the 16th. Agnes turned northward on June 17 and became a hurricane over the southeastern Gulf of Mexico the next day. A continued northward motion brought Agnes to the Florida Panhandle coast on June 19 as a Category 1 hurricane. Agnes turned northeastward after landfall and weakened to a depression over Georgia. However, it regained tropical storm strength over eastern North Carolina on June 21 and moved into the Atlantic later that day. A northwestward turn followed, and a just-under-hurricane-strength Agnes made a final landfall on the 22nd near New York, New York. The storm merged with a non-tropical low on June 23rd, with the combined system affecting the northeastern United States until the 25th.

Agnes was barely a hurricane at landfall in Florida, and the effects of winds and storm surges were relatively minor. The major impact was over the northeastern United States, where Agnes combined with the non-tropical low to produce widespread rains of 6 to 12 inches with local amounts of 14 to 19 inches. These rains produced widespread severe flooding from Virginia northward to New York, with other flooding occurring over the western portions of the Carolinas.

Agnes caused 122 deaths in the United States. Nine of these were in Florida (mainly from severe thunderstorms) while the remainder were associated with the flooding. The storm was responsible for $2.1 billion in damage in the United States, the vast majority of which came from the flooding. Agnes also affected western Cuba, where seven additional deaths occurred.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Agnes.

For an interactive map of Hurricane Agnes visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Tropical Storm Claudette 1979
Click for a larger map of Tropcial Storm Claudette 1979Claudette was first detected as a tropical wave that moved off the African coast on July 11. The wave spawned a tropical depression on July 16 that briefly became a tropical storm the next day as it approached the Leeward and Virgin Islands. Claudette weakened to a tropical depression and then a tropical wave while passing near Puerto Rico on the 18th, and little re-development occurred until the system moved into the southeastern Gulf of Mexico on the 21st. Claudette regained tropical storm strength over the western Gulf on July 23 and made landfall the next day near the Louisiana-Texas border. It made a slow loop over southeastern Texas on the 24th and 25th, followed by a northward motion into Oklahoma on the 27th. The remnants of Claudette turned eastward and merged with a frontal system over West Virginia on July 29.

Claudette produced tropical storm conditions along portions of the Texas and Louisiana coasts, but the storm will be most remembered for its rainfall. Widespread amounts in excess of 10 inches occurred over portions of southeastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana, with several local amounts in excess of 30 inches. An observer west of Alvin, Texas reported 43 inches in 24 hours, which is a United States record for 24 hour rainfall amount. The storm total at that location was 45 inches. The rains produced severe flooding that was responsible for one death and $400 million in damage. The storm also produced heavy rains over portions of Puerto Rico that were responsible for one death.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Tropical Storm Claudette.

For an interactive map of Tropical Storm Claudette visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Alicia 1983
Click for a larger map of Hurricane Alicia 1983 Click here for a larger image of AliciaAlicia formed over the north central Gulf of Mexico on August 15. It drifted slowly westward and northwestward while steadily strengthening on the 16th and 17th. This motion brought Alicia over the western end of Galveston Island, Texas as a Category 3 hurricane on August 18. Alicia moved northwestward into Oklahoma as a tropical depression on August 19, then turned northward before dissipating over Nebraska on the 21st.

The Coast Guard cutter Buttonwood moored at Galveston reported sustained winds of 96 mph with gusts to 125 mph. Hobby Airport at Houston, Texas reported 94 mph sustained winds with gusts to 107 mph. Wind gusts of hurricane force in downtown Houston littered the streets with broken glass as windows broke in the high-rise buildings. Additionally, twenty-three tornadoes were reported from Alicia.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Alicia.

For an interactive map of Hurricane Alicia visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

Alicia was responsible for 21 deaths and $2 billion in damage in the United States.

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Hurricane Gilbert 1988
Click for a larger map of Gilbert 1988 Hurricane Hurricane Gilbert A tropical wave exiting the African coastline on September 3rd developed into the 12th tropical depression of the season on September 8th while approaching the Windward Islands. The cyclone rapidly strengthened to hurricane status on September 10th as a west-northwest motion brought Gilbert into the eastern Caribbean Sea. Gilbert passed directly over Jamaica on September 12th as a major hurricane, becoming the first direct impact for the island from a hurricane since 1951. Winds gusted to nearly 150 mph as Gilbert produced a 9-foot storm surge along Jamaica’s northeast coast. Jamaica was devastated as the eyewall traversed the entire length of the island. During this period the eye contracted from 25 nmi to only 12 nmi upon exiting Jamaica.

Gilbert emerged off the western coastline of Jamaica and began a period of extraordinarily rapid intensification. The ferocious hurricane strengthened to Category 4 status as its northern eyewall pounded Grand Cayman Island with 155 mph wind gusts early on September 13th. Gilbert’s remarkable intensification trend continued as the cyclone reached Category 5 status on the afternoon of the 13th and eventually reached peak winds of 185 mph. The minimum central pressure of the cyclone plummeted to 888 millibars, which represented a 70-millibar drop in only a 24-hour period. This minimum central pressure recorded by NOAA aircraft was the lowest pressure ever recorded in the western hemisphere until Hurricane Wilma in 2005. Gilbert crossed the northeast coast of Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula on September 14th, becoming the first Category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic basin to strike land since Camille in 1969.

Gilbert weakened over the Yucatan peninsula and emerged into the western Gulf of Mexico as a Category 2 hurricane. Gilbert’s large circulation regained major hurricane status as the cyclone continued on a west-northwest course on the 16th. The hurricane made its final landfall near the town of La Pesca on the Mexican Gulf Coast on the evening of September 16th as a strong Category 3 hurricane. Gilbert’s remnants spawned 29 tornadoes over Texas on September 18th, with flooding spreading to the Midwest as the remnants merged with a frontal boundary over Missouri on September 19th. Although no reliable measurements of storm surge exist from Gilbert’s two Mexican landfalls, estimates are that Gilbert produced between 15 and 20 feet of surge along the Yucatan and 8 to 13 feet at landfall in mainland Mexico.

Gilbert’s large size and impacts were felt over much of the Caribbean, Central America as well as portions of the United States. The death toll of 318 gives an idea of the scope of Gilbert's impacts: Mexico 202, Jamaica 45, Haiti 30, Guatemala 12, Honduras 12, Dominican Republic 5, Venezuela 5, United States 3, Costa Rica 2, and Nicaragua 2. The deaths from Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Venezuela were caused by inland flash flooding from outer rainbands.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Gilbert.

For an interactive map of Hurricane Gilbert visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Hugo 1989
Click for a larger map of Hugo 1989 Hurricane Click here for a larger image of HugoThis classic Cape Verde hurricane was first detected as a tropical wave emerging from the coast of Africa on September 9. Moving steadily westward, the system became a tropical depression the next day, a tropical storm on the 11th, and a hurricane on the 13th. Hugo turned west-northwest on September 15 as it became a Category 5 hurricane. It was still a Category 4 hurricane when the center moved through the Leeward Islands and St. Croix, USVI, and the 18th. Turning northwestward, the center passed across the eastern end of Puerto Rico on September 19. This general motion would continue with some acceleration until Hugo made landfall just north of Charleston, South Carolina on 22 September. Strengthening in the last twelve hours before landfall made Hugo a Category 4 hurricane at the coast. After landfall, the storm gradually recurved northeastward, becoming extratropical over southeastern Canada on September 23.

The Naval Air Station at Roosevelt Roads, PR reported sustained winds of 104 mph with gusts to 120 mph, which were the highest winds reported from the Caribbean. A ship moored in the Sampit River in South Carolina measured sustained winds of 120 mph. High winds associated with Hugo extended far inland, with Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina reporting 67 mph sustained winds with gusts to 110 mph and Charlotte, North Carolina reporting 69 mph sustained winds and gusts to 99 mph.

Storm surge from Hugo inundated the South Carolina Coast from Charleston to Myrtle Beach, with maximum storm tides of 20 ft observed in the Cape Romain-Bulls Bay area.

Hugo was responsible for 21 deaths in the mainland United States, five more in Puerto Rico and the U. S. Virgin Islands, and 24 more elsewhere in the Caribbean. Damage estimates are $7 billion in the mainland United States and $1 billion in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Hugo.

For an interactive map of Hurricane Hugo visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Andrew 1992
Click for a larger map of Andrew 1992 Hurricane Click here for a larger image of AndrewOne of the most destructive United States hurricanes of record started modestly as a tropical wave that emerged from the west coast of Africa on August 14. The wave spawned a tropical depression on August 16, which became Tropical Storm Andrew the next day. Further development was slow, as the west-northwestward moving Andrew encountered an unfavorable upper-level trough. Indeed, the storm almost dissipated on August 20 due to vertical wind shear. By August 21, Andrew was midway between Bermuda and Puerto Rico and turning westward into a more favorable environment. Rapid strengthening occurred, with Andrew reaching hurricane strength on the 22nd and Category 4 status on the 23rd. After briefly weakening over the Bahamas, Andrew regained Category 4 status as it blasted its way across south Florida on August 24. The hurricane continued westward into the Gulf of Mexico where it gradually turned northward. This motion brought Andrew to the central Louisiana coast on August 26 as a Category 3 hurricane. Andrew then turned northeastward, eventually merging with a frontal system over the Mid-Atlantic states on August 28.

Reports from private barometers helped establish that Andrew's central pressure at landfall in Homestead, Florida was 27.23 inches, which makes it the third most intense hurricane of record to hit the United States. Andrew's peak winds in south Florida were not directly measured due to destruction of the measuring instruments. An automated station at Fowey Rocks reported 142 mph sustained winds with gusts to 169 mph (measured 144 ft above the ground), and higher values may have occurred after the station was damaged and stopped reporting. The National Hurricane Center had a peak gust of 164 mph (measured 130 ft above the ground), while a 177 mph gust was measured at a private home. Additionally, Berwick, LA reported 96 mph sustained winds with gusts to 120 mph.

Andrew produced a 17 ft storm surge near the landfall point in Florida, while storm tides of at least 8 ft inundated portions of the Louisiana coast. Andrew also produced a killer tornado in southeastern Louisiana.

Andrew is responsible for 23 deaths in the United States and three more in the Bahamas. The hurricane caused $26.5 billion in damage in the United States, of which $1 billion occurred in Louisiana and the rest in south Florida. The vast majority of the damage in Florida was due to the winds. Damage in the Bahamas was estimated at $250 million.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Andrew.

For an interactive map of Hurricane Andrew visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

More images of Andrew are available from NASA Goddard Laboratory website.

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Tropical Storm Alberto 1994
Click to see a larger map of TS Alberto 1994 Click to see a large radar image of TS Alberto 1994Alberto was first detected as a tropical wave that moved off the African coast on 18 June. The wave moved into the western Caribbean by late June and formed into a tropical depression near the western tip of Cuba on June 30. The cyclone moved northwest through July 1 as it became a tropical storm, then it turned northward. This motion continued until the cyclone made landfall in the western Florida Panhandle on the 4th. Alberto then moved north-northeastward into western Georgia, where it did a loop on the 5th and 6th. The cyclone finally dissipated over central Alabama on July 7.

Alberto's winds and tides produced only minor damage at the coast, but the excessive rains that fell in Georgia, Alabama, and western Florida were another story. Amounts exceeded 10 inches in many locations, with the maximum being the 27.61 inch storm total at Americus, GA (including 21 inches in 24 hours). Severe flooding resulted over large portions of southern Georgia, western Alabama, and the western Florida Panhandle. The floods were responsible for 30 deaths and $500 million in damage.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Tropical Storm Alberto.

More information on flooding from Alberto is available at the National Climatic Data Center website.

For an interactive map of Tropical Storm Alberto visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Opal 1995
Click to view a larger map of Hurricane Opal 1995Opal was first detected as a tropical wave moving off the African coast on September 11. The waved moved westward through the Atlantic and Caribbean and merged with a broad low pressure area over the western Caribbean on September 23. The combined system then developed into a tropical depression near the east coast of the Yucatan Peninsula on September 27. The depression drifted slowly northward, becoming Tropical Storm Opal as it reached the north coast of Yucatan on the 30th. Opal then moved slowly westward into the Bay of Campeche, where it became a hurricane on October 2. A gradual north-northeastward turn started later on the 2nd, with acceleration on the 3rd and 4th. Opal continued to strengthen, and a period of rapid strengthening late of the 3rd and early on the 4th made it a Category 4 hurricane. Weakening followed, and Opal was a Category 3 hurricane when it made landfall near Pensacola Beach, Florida late on the 4th. Opal continued quickly north-northeastward and became extratropical over the Ohio Valley on the 5th. The cyclone was last seen over the eastern Great Lakes on October 6.

Hurlbert Field, Florida reported sustained winds of 84 mph with a peak gust of 144 mph, and gusts to 70 mph occurred as far inland as northwest Georgia. However, the main impact from Opal was from storm surge. A combination of storm surge and breaking waves inundated portions of the western Florida Panhandle coast to a depth of 10 to 20 ft. The surge was responsible for the bulk of the $3 billion in damage attributed to Opal in the United States.

Opal was responsible for 9 deaths in the United States, including 8 from falling trees and one from a tornado. Opal was responsible for 50 deaths in Mexico and Guatemala due to flooding caused by heavy rains.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Opal (PDF).

For an interactive map of Hurricane Opal visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Mitch 1998
Click for a larger map of Mitch 1998 Click here for a larger image of MitchThis powerful hurricane began developing over the southwestern Caribbean Sea on 22 October. It drifted westward and became a tropical storm later that day, then turned northward and became a hurricane by the 24th. Mitch then turned westward again and rapidly strengthened, becoming a Category 5 hurricane with a central pressure of 905 mb on the 26th. After passing over Swan Island on the 27th, a weakening Mitch moved slowly southward near the coastal Islands of Honduras. It made landfall over northern Honduras on the 29th as a Category 1 hurricane. Mitch gradually turned westward after landfall, and the surface center dissipated neat the Guatemala-Honduras border on 1 November.

The remnant circulation aloft reached the Bay of Campeche on 2 November and began developing again. The re-born Mitch became a tropical storm on 3 November, then moved northeastward across the Yucatan Peninsula on the 4th. Mitch crossed south Florida as a tropical storm on the 5th and then became extratropical later that day. The extratropical cyclone remained strong as it crossed the Atlantic, eventually affecting the British Isles and Iceland on the 9th and 10th.

Mitch ravaged the offshore islands of Honduras with high winds, seas, and storm surge. However the greatest impact was widespread heavy rains and severe floods in Honduras, Nicaragua, Guatemala, and El Salvador. Mitch caused an estimated 9,000 deaths in Central America with another 9,000 missing. Thirty-one people died when the schooner Fantome sank as it encountered the high winds and seas associated with the hurricane. Two people died in the Florida Keys when a fishing boat capsized. Mitch caused tremendous property, infrastructure, and crop damage in Central America, and an additional $40 million in damage in Florida.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Mitch (PDF).

For an interactive map of Hurricane Mitch visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Floyd 1999
Click for a larger map of the Floyd 1999 Hurricane Click here for a larger image of FloydFloyd was first detected as a tropical wave that moved off the African coast on September 2. The system developed into a tropical depression over the tropical Atlantic on September 7. Moving steadily west-northwestward, the system became a tropical storm the next day and a hurricane on the 10th. A northwestward turn late on the 10th was followed by a westward turn on the 12th, with the second turn marking the time Floyd started strengthening in earnest. It became a Category 4 hurricane on September 13 as it approached the central Bahama Islands. A west-northwestward turn late on the 13th took the center through the northeastern Bahamas. This was followed by a gradual turn to the north-northeast, which brought the center to the North Carolina coast near Cape Fear on September 16 as a Category 2 hurricane. Floyd continued north-northeastward along the coast of the Mid-Atlantic into New England, where the storm became extratropical on the 17th. The remnants of Floyd merged with a large non-tropical low on September 19.

While wind gusts of 120 mph and storm surges of 9 to 10 ft were reported from the North Carolina coast, Floyd will be most remembered in the United States for its rainfall. The combination of Floyd and a frontal system over the eastern United States produced widespread rainfalls in excess of 10 inches from North Carolina northeastward, with amounts as high as 19.06 inches in Wilmington, North Carolina and 13.70 inches at Brewster, New York. These rains, aided by rains from Tropical Storm Dennis two weeks earlier, caused widespread severe flooding that caused the majority of the $3 to 6 billion in damage caused by Floyd. These floods also were responsible for 50 of the 56 deaths caused by Floyd in the United States. Floyd also caused damage in the Bahamas, with one death reported.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Floyd (PDF).

For an interactive map of Hurricane Floyd visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

Information on rainfall and flooding from Floyd is available from the NOAA National Climatic Data Center.

More images of Floyd are available from NASA Goddard Laboratory website.

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Hurricane Keith 2000
Click for a larger map of Keith 2000 Click here for a larger image of KeithKeith began developing on 28 September when a tropical depression formed over the northwestern Caribbean Sea. The cyclone moved slowly northwestward on the 29th as it became a tropical storm, then it rapidly intensified into a Category 4 hurricane on the 30th while drifting westward toward the coast of Belize. Keith stalled with the eyewall over the offshore islands of Belize on 1 October, and it wasn't until the 3rd that the center made landfall in Belize. Keith weakened during this time and was a tropical storm at landfall. It moved west-northwestward over the Yucatan Peninsula and further weakened to a depression on the 4th.

Keith emerged in the Bay of Campeche late that day and quickly regained tropical storm strength. It again became a hurricane on the 5th before making landfall just north of Tampico, Mexico as a Category 1 hurricane. The cyclone dissipated over northeastern Mexico the next day.

Keith was responsible for 24 deaths - 12 in Nicaragua, 5 in Belize, 6 in Honduras, and 1 in Mexico. The deaths in Belize occurred when two catamarans broke loose during the storm, while 5 of the deaths in Honduras occurred when an airplane disappeared near Roatan Island. Damage to property, agriculture, and tourism in Belize was estimated at $225 million.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Keith (PDF).

For an interactive map of Hurricane Keith visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Tropical Storm Allison 2001
Click for a larger map of the Allison 2001 Tropical Storm
Allison's long and complex career began on 5 June as an area of disturbed weather over the northwestern Gulf of Mexico developed into a tropical storm. The storm made landfall near Freeport, Texas later that day. Allison weakened to a depression on the 6th, while drifting northward, then it made a slow loop over southeastern Texas from the 7th to the 9th. The cyclone moved into the Gulf of Mexico on the 10th and acquired subtropical characteristics. It then moved east-northeastward over southeastern Louisiana on the 11th, where it re-intensified into a subtropical storm. Allison weakened back to a subtropical depression on the 12th while continuing east-northeastward, and this motion carried it to southeastern North Carolina by the 14th where it again stalled. The cyclone drifted northward to northeastward drift over land on the 15th and 16th. This was followed by a faster northeastward motion on the 17th as the center emerged into the Atlantic. Allison regained subtropical storm strength later that day before becoming extratropical on the 18th southeast of Cape Cod. The system dissipated southeast of Nova Scotia the next day.

Allison brought tropical-storm-force winds and above normal tides to portions of the Texas and Louisiana coasts. However, the greatest legacy of the cyclone was the widespread heavy rains and resulting floods along the entire path of the cyclone (figure). Houston, Texas, was the worst affected area, as the Port of Houston reported 36.99 inches and several other locations reported more than 30 inches (figure). The storm also spawned 23 tornadoes. Allison was responsible for 41 deaths and at least $5 billion in damage in the United States, making it the deadliest and costliest U. S. tropical storm of record.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Tropical Storm Allison (PDF).

For an interactive map of Tropical Storm Allison visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Iris 2001
Click for a larger map of Iris 2001 Click here for a larger image of IrisIris first became a tropical depression just east of the lesser Antilles on 4 October. The depression tracked west-northwestward into the eastern Caribbean where it became a tropical storm on the 5th and a hurricane on the 6th. Iris then turned westward, passing just south of Jamaica on the 7th. The storm then moved quickly west-southwestward toward the coast of Belize as it became a small but powerful Category 4 hurricane on the 8th (figure). Iris made landfall over southern Belize early on the 9th at Category 4 intensity, then quickly weakened after landfall to dissipation later that day.

The winds and storm surges of Iris caused severe damage over portions of the southern Belize coast. The storm was responsible for 31 deaths, including 20 in Belize, 8 in Guatemala, and 3 in the Dominican Republic. The deaths in Belize occurred when the M/V Wave Dancer capsized in port, killing 20 of the 28 people on board.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Iris (PDF).

For an interactive map of Hurricane Iris visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Isabel 2003
Click for a larger map of Iris 2001 Click here for a larger image of
IsabelA well-organized but slow moving tropical wave that exited the African coastline on September 1st developed into Tropical Storm Isabel on the morning of September 6th. Isabel became a hurricane on September 7th and rapidly intensified to Category 4 hurricane strength on the evening of the 8th while the eye was located more than 1100 miles to the east of the Leeward Islands. This impressive hurricane reached Category 5 strength on September 11th, making Isabel the strongest hurricane in the Atlantic basin since Mitch in October 1998. The cyclone turned northwestward around the western periphery of the Atlantic ridge beginning on the 15th. Isabel began to weaken on the 15th as conditions aloft became more hostile, and it fell below major hurricane strength for the first time in eight days on the 16th.

Although weakening, Isabel’s wind field continued to expand as hurricane warnings were issued for most of the North Carolina and Virginia coastline, including the Chesapeake Bay. Isabel’s large eye pushed ashore just after the noon hour on September 18th near Drum Inlet along North Carolina’s Outer Banks. Isabel was the worst hurricane to affect the Chesapeake Bay region since 1933. Storm surge values of more than 8 feet flooded rivers that flowed into the Bay across Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C. Isabel brought tropical storm force gusts as far north as New York State as it moved inland. The most intense hurricane of the 2003 season directly resulted in 17 deaths and more than 3 billion dollars* in damages. The large wind field toppled trees and cut power to more than four million customers.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Isabel (PDF).

For an interactive map of Hurricane Isabel visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Charley 2004
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Charley originated from a tropical wave, developing into a tropical depression on August 9 about 115 miles south-southeast of Barbados. The depression strengthened within a low-shear environment to a tropical storm early the next day in the eastern Caribbean, and became a hurricane on the 11th near Jamaica. Charley's center passed about 40 miles southwest of the southwest coast of Jamaica, and then passed about 15 miles northeast of Grand Cayman as the hurricane reached category 2 strength on the 12th. Charley turned to the north-northwest and continued to strengthen, making landfall in western Cuba as a category 3 hurricane with 120 m.p.h. maximum winds. Charley weakened just after its passage over western Cuba; its maximum winds decreased to about 110 m.p.h. by the time the center reached the Dry Tortugas around 8 am on the 13th.

Charley then came under the influence of an unseasonably strong mid-tropospheric trough that had dropped from the east-central United States into the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The hurricane turned north-northeastward and accelerated toward the southwest coast of Florida as it began to intensify rapidly; dropsonde measurements indicate that Charley's central pressure fell from 964 mb to 941 mb in 4.5 hours. By 10 am, the maximum winds had increased to near 125 m.p.h., and three hours later had increased to 145 m.p.h. - category 4 strength. Charley made landfall with maximum winds near 150 m.p.h. on the southwest coast of Florida just north of Captiva Island around 3:45 pm. An hour later, Charley's eye passed over Punta Gorda. The hurricane then crossed central Florida, passing near Kissimmee and Orlando. Charley was still of hurricane intensity around midnight when its center cleared the northeast coast of Florida near Daytona Beach. After moving into the Atlantic, Charley came ashore again near Cape Romain, South Carolina near midday on the 14th as a category 1 hurricane. The center then moved just offshore before making a final landfall at North Myrtle Beach. Charley soon weakened to a tropical storm over southeastern North Carolina and became extratropical on the 15th as it moved back over water near Virginia Beach.

Although ferocious, Charley was a very small hurricane at its Florida landfall, with its maximum winds and storm surge located only about 6-7 miles from the center. This helped minimize the extent and amplitude of the storm surge, which likely did not exceed 7 feet. However, the hurricane's violent winds devastated Punta Gorda and neighboring Port Charlotte. Rainfall amounts were generally modest, less than 8 inches. Charley also produced 16 tornadoes in Florida, North Carolina and Virginia. The total U. S. damage is estimated to be near $15 billion, making Charley the second costliest hurricane in U.S. history. Casualties were remarkably low, given the strength of the hurricane and the destruction that resulted. Charley was directly responsible for ten deaths in the United States. There were also four deaths in Cuba and one in Jamaica.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Charley.

For an interactive map of Hurricane Charley visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Frances 2004
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Frances developed from a tropical wave, becoming a tropical depression on August 25 several hundred miles west-southwest of the southern Cape Verde Islands, a tropical storm later that day, and a hurricane the following day. Frances moved generally west-northwestward for the next several days, passing north of the Leeward Islands on the 31st and just north of the Turks and Caicos Islands on the 2nd . During this time, Frances' peak winds reached 145 m.p.h. (category 4) on two occasions while the hurricane underwent a series of concentric eyewall cycles. Westerly wind shear then caused Frances to weaken to a category 2 hurricane by the time it passed over the northwestern Bahamas on the 4th . Frances made landfall near Stuart, Florida just after midnight on the 5th with 105 m.p.h. (category 2) maximum winds. Frances gradually weakened as it moved slowly across the Florida Peninsula, and became a tropical storm just before emerging into the northeastern Gulf of Mexico early on September 6. Frances made a final landfall in the Florida Big Bend region that afternoon as a tropical storm. Frances weakened over the southeastern United States and became extratropical over West Virginia on the 9th .

Frances produced a storm surge of nearly 6 feet at its Florida east coast landfall, and caused widespread heavy rains and associated freshwater flooding over much of the eastern United States, with a maximum reported rainfall of 18.07 inches at Linville Falls, North Carolina. Frances was also associated with an outbreak of over 100 tornadoes throughout the southeastern and mid-Atlantic states. Eight deaths resulted from the forces of the storm - seven in the United States and one in the Bahamas. U.S. damage is estimated to be near $8.9 billion, over 90% of which occurred in Florida.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Frances (PDF).

For an interactive map of Hurricane Frances visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Ivan 2004
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Ivan developed from a large tropical wave that crossed the west coast of Africa on August 31, and spawned a tropical depression two days later. The depression reached storm strength on September 3rd (one of only a dozen on record to do so south of 10EN) and continued to strengthen. By the 5th , Ivan had become a hurricane about 1150 miles east of the southern Windward Islands. Eighteen hours later Ivan became the southernmost storm to reach major hurricane status, at 10.2EN. Ivan was a category 3 hurricane when the center passed about 7 miles south of Grenada, a path that took the northern eyewall of Ivan directly over the island. In the Caribbean, Ivan became a category 5 hurricane, with winds of 160 m.p.h., on the 9th when it was south of the Dominican Republic, and on two occasions the minimum pressure fell to 910 mb. The center of Ivan passed within about 20 miles of Jamaica on the 11th and a similar distance from Grand Cayman on the 12th , with Grand Cayman likely experiencing sustained winds of category 4 strength. Ivan then turned to the northwest and passed through the Yucatan channel on the 14th , bringing hurricane conditions to extreme western Cuba. Ivan moved across the east-central Gulf of Mexico, making landfall as a major hurricane with sustained winds of near 120 m.p.h. on the 16th just west of Gulf Shores, Alabama.

Ivan weakened as it moved inland, producing over 100 tornadoes and heavy rains across much of the southeastern United States, before merging with a frontal system over the Delmarva Peninsula on the 18th. While this would normally be the end of the story, the extratropical remnant low of Ivan split off from the frontal system and drifted southward in the western Atlantic for several days, crossed southern Florida, and re-entered the Gulf of Mexico on the 21st. The low re-acquired tropical characteristics, becoming a tropical storm for the second time on the 22nd in the central Gulf. Ivan weakened before it made its final landfall in southwestern Louisiana as a tropical depression on the 24th.

Ivan's storm surge completely over-washed the island of Grand Cayman, where an estimated 95% of the buildings were damaged or destroyed. Surge heights of 10-15 feet occurred along the Gulf coast during Ivan's first U.S. landfall. Peak rainfall amounts in the Caribbean and United States were generally 10-15 inches. The death toll from Ivan stands at 92 - 39 in Grenada, 25 in the United States, 17 in Jamaica, 4 in Dominican Republic, 3 in Venezuela, 2 in the Cayman Islands, and 1 each in Tobago and Barbados. U.S. damage is estimated to be near $14.2 billion, the third largest total on record.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Ivan (PDF).

For an interactive map of Hurricane Ivan visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Jeanne 2004
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Jeanne formed from a tropical wave, becoming a tropical depression on September 13 near the Leeward Islands, and strengthening to a tropical storm the next day. Moving west-northwestward, Jeanne struck Puerto Rico on the 15th with 70 m.p.h. winds and then strengthened to a hurricane just before making landfall in the Dominican Republic. Jeanne spent nearly 36 hours over the rough terrain of Hispaniola, generating torrential rainfall before emerging into the Atlantic north of the island. Steering currents in the western Atlantic were weak, and Jeanne moved slowly through and north of the southeastern Bahamas over the next five days while it gradually regained the strength it had lost over Hispaniola. By the 23rd , high pressure had built in over the northeastern United States and western Atlantic, causing Jeanne to turn westward. Jeanne strengthened and became a major hurricane on the 25th while the center moved over Abaco and then Grand Bahama Island. Early on the 26th , the center of Jeanne's 60-mile-wide eye crossed the Florida coast near Stuart, at virtually the identical spot that Frances had come ashore three weeks earlier. Maximum winds at the time of landfall are estimated to be near 120 m.p.h.

Jeanne weakened as it moved across central Florida, becoming a tropical storm during the afternoon of the 26th near Tampa, and then weakening to a depression a day later over central Georgia. The depression was still accompanied by heavy rain when it moved over the Carolinas, Virginia, and the Delmarva Peninsula on the 28th and 29th before becoming extratropical.

Jeanne produced extreme rain accumulations in Puerto Rico and Hispaniola, with nearly 24 inches reported in Vieques. Rains from the cyclone resulted in historic floods in Puerto Rico, and deadly flash-floods and mudslides in Haiti, where over 3000 people lost their lives and roughly 200,000 were left homeless. Three deaths occurred in Florida, and one each in Puerto Rico, South Carolina, and Virginia. In the United States, damage is estimated to be near $6.9 billion.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Jeanne (PDF).

For an interactive map of Hurricane Jeanne visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Dennis 2005
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Dennis formed from a tropical wave that moved westward across the coast of Africa on June 29. A tropical depression developed from the wave on July 4 near the southern Windward Islands. The cyclone moved west-northwestward across the eastern and central Caribbean sea, became a tropical storm on July 5, and strengthened into a hurricane early on July 6 about 245 miles east-southeast of Jamaica. Dennis intensified over the next two days, becoming a major hurricane on July 7 and a Category 4 hurricane with winds of 150 mph the next day just south of central Cuba. Dennis passed over Cabo Cruz, Cuba early on July 8 with winds of 135 mph, and then made landfall along the south-central coast of Cuba that afternoon near Cienfuegos with winds of 145 mph. After landfall, Dennis passed near Havana and weakened to a Category 1 hurricane before emerging over the southeastern Gulf of Mexico early on July 9. Although Dennis re-intensified into a Category 4 hurricane with winds of 145 mph early on July 10 over the eastern Gulf of Mexico, it weakened to Category 3 strength before making landfall over the western Florida Panhandle near Navarre Beach late that day. Dennis degenerated to a low pressure area over the Tennessee and Ohio Valleys, and it was eventually absorbed by an extratropical low over southeastern Canada on July 18.

Dennis brought hurricane conditions to many portions of Cuba. Cabo Cruz reported sustained winds of 133 mph with a gust to 148 mph at 0200 UTC July 8, with a minimum pressure of 956 mb at 0240 UTC just before the eye passed over the station. The anemometer was destroyed, and it is possible more extreme winds occurred. Dennis also caused hurricane conditions in the western Florida Panhandle. An instrumented tower run by the Florida Coastal Monitoring Program (FCMP) at Navarre measured 1-min average winds (5-m elevation) of 99 mph and a gust to 121 mph at 1921 UTC July 10.

Storm-total rainfalls in excess of 23 inches occurred on both Cuba and Jamaica. Heavy rainfall also occurred over much of Florida and extended well inland over portions of the southeastern United States with the maximum amount of 12.80 inches near Camden, Alabama. Ten tornadoes were reported in association with Dennis in the United States.

Dennis caused 42 deaths - 22 in Haiti, 16 in Cuba, 3 in the United States, and 1 in Jamaica. The hurricane caused considerable damage across central and eastern Cuba as well as the western Florida Panhandle, including widespread utility and communications outages. Considerable storm surge-related damage also occurred near St. Marks, Florida, well to the east of the landfall location. The damage associated with Dennis in the United States is estimated at $2.23 billion. Damage in Jamaica is estimated at 1.9 billion Jamaican dollars* (approximately $31.7 million U. S.).

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Dennis (PDF).

For an interactive map of Hurricane Dennis visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Katrina 2005
Click for a larger map of Katrina
Katrina was one of the most devastating hurricanes in the history of the United States. It is the deadliest hurricane to strike the United States since the Palm Beach-Lake Okeechobee hurricane of September 1928. It produced catastrophic damage - estimated at $75 billion in the New Orleans area and along the Mississippi coast - and is the costliest U. S. hurricane on record.

This horrific tropical cyclone formed from the combination of a tropical wave, an upper-level trough, and the mid-level remnants of Tropical Depression Ten. A tropical depression formed on August 23 about 200 miles southeast of Nassau in the Bahamas. Moving northwestward, it became Tropical Storm Katrina during the following day about 75 miles east-southeast of Nassau. The storm moved through the northwestern Bahamas on August 24-25, and then turned westward toward southern Florida. Katrina became a hurricane just before making landfall near the Miami-Dade/Broward county line during the evening of August 25. The hurricane moved southwestward across southern Florida into the eastern Gulf of Mexico on August 26. Katrina then strengthened significantly, reaching Category 5 intensity on August 28. Later that day, maximum sustained winds reached 175 mph with an aircraft-measured central pressure of 902 mb while centered about 195 miles southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River. Katrina turned to the northwest and then north, with the center making landfall near Buras, Louisiana at 1110 UTC August 29 with maximum winds estimated at 125 mph (Category 3). Continuing northward, the hurricane made a second landfall near the Louisiana/Mississippi border at 1445 UTC with maximum winds estimated at 120 mph (Category 3). Weakening occurred as Katrina moved north-northeastward over land, but it was still a hurricane near Laurel, Mississippi. The cyclone weakened to a tropical depression over the Tennessee Valley on 30 August. Katrina became an extratropical low on August 31 and was absorbed by a frontal zone later that day over the eastern Great Lakes.

Katrina brought hurricane conditions to southeastern Louisiana, southern Mississippi, and southwestern Alabama. The Coastal Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) station at Grand Isle, Louisiana reported 10-minute average winds of 87 mph at 0820 UTC August 29 with a gust to 114 mph. Higher winds likely occurred there and elsewhere, as many stations were destroyed, lost power, or lost communications during the storm. Storm surge flooding of 25 to 28 feet above normal tide level occurred along portions of the Mississippi coast, with storm surge flooding of 10 to 20 feet above normal tide levels along the southeastern Louisiana coast. Hurricane conditions also occurred over southern Florida and the Dry Tortugas. The National Hurricane Center reported sustained winds of 69 mph at 0115 UTC August 26 with a gust to 87 mph. Additionally, tropical storm conditions occurred along the northern Gulf coast as far east as the coast of the western Florida Panhandle, as well as in the Florida Keys. Katrina caused 10 to 14 inches of rain over southern Florida, and 8 to 12 inches of rain along its track inland from the northern Gulf coast. Thirty-three tornadoes were reported from the storm.

Katrina is responsible for approximately 1200 reported deaths, including about 1000 in Louisiana and 200 in Mississippi. Seven additional deaths occurred in southern Florida. Katrina caused catastrophic damage in southeastern Louisiana and southern Mississippi. Storm surge along the Mississippi coast caused total destruction of many structures, with the surge damage extending several miles inland. Similar damage occurred in portions of southeastern Louisiana southeast of New Orleans. The surge overtopped and breached levees in the New Orleans metropolitan area, resulting in the inundation of much of the city and its eastern suburbs. Wind damage from Katrina extended well inland into northern Mississippi and Alabama. The hurricane also caused wind and water damage in Miami-Dade and Broward counties.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Katrina (PDF).

For an interactive map of Hurricane Katrina visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Rita 2005
Click for a larger map of Rita
Rita, the third Category 5 hurricane of the season, was a destructive and deadly hurricane that devastated portions of southeastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana and significantly impacted the Florida Keys.

A tropical wave and the remnants of an old front combined to produce and area of disturbed weather on 16 September. This system became a depression just east of the Turks and Caicos Islands late on 17 September, which moved westward and became a tropical storm the following afternoon. Maximum winds increased to 70 mph as Rita moved through the central Bahamas on September 19. While the storm did not strengthen during the following night, rapid intensification began on September 20 as it moved through the Straits of Florida. Rita became a hurricane that day and reached Category 2 intensity as the center passed about 50 miles south of Key West, Florida.

After entering the Gulf of Mexico, Rita intensified from Category 2 to Category 5 in about 24 hours. The maximum sustained winds reached 165 mph late on September 21, and the hurricane reached a peak intensity of 180 mph early on September 22. Weakening began later that day and continued until landfall around 0740 UTC 24 September just east of the Texas/Louisiana border between Sabine Pass and Johnson's Bayou. At that time, maximum sustained winds were 115 mph (Category 3). Weakening continued after landfall, but Rita remained a tropical storm until reaching northwestern Louisiana late on 24 September. The cyclone then turned northeastward and merged with a frontal system two days later. Rita brought hurricane conditions to southwestern Louisiana and southeastern Texas. A FCMP instrumented tower at Port Arthur reported 1-min average winds of 94 mph at 0826 UTC September 24 along with a gust of 116 mph. The C-MAN station at Sea Rim State Park, Texas reported 2-minute average winds of 82 mph at 0700 UTC September 24, along with a peak gust of 99 mph. The hurricane caused storm-surge flooding of 10 to 15 ft above normal tide levels along the southwestern coast of Louisiana, caused a notable surge on the inland Lake Livingston, Texas, and inundated portions of the New Orleans area previously flooded by Katrina. Tropical storm conditions occurred in the Florida Keys, where the C-MAN station at Sand Key reported 10-minute average winds of 72 mph at 2110 UTC September 20 with a gust to 92 mph. The station failed shortly thereafter. Storm surge flooding of up to 5 feet above normal tide levels occurred in the Keys.

Rita produced rainfalls of 5 to 9 inches over large portions of Louisiana, Mississippi, and eastern Texas, with isolated amounts of 10 to 15 inches. The cyclone spawned an estimated 90 tornadoes over the southern United States.

Devastating storm surge flooding and wind damage in occurred southwestern Louisiana and extreme southeastern Texas, with some surge damage occurring in the Florida Keys. Rita was responsible for seven deaths, and it caused damage estimated at $10 billion in the United States.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Rita (PDF).

For an interactive map of Hurricane Rita visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Wilma 2005
Click for a larger map of Wilma
The massive and powerful Wilma formed from a broad area of disturbed weather that stretched across much of the Caribbean Sea during the second week of October. A surface low pressure system gradually became defined near Jamaica on October 14, leading to the formation of a tropical depression on October 15 about 220 miles east-southeast of Grand Cayman. The cyclone moved erratically westward and southward for two days while slowly strengthening into a tropical storm. Wilma became a hurricane and began a west-northwestward motion on October 18. Later that day, Wilma began to explosively deepen. The aircraft-measured minimum central pressure reached 882 mb near 0800 UTC October 19. This pressure was accompanied by a 2-4 mile wide eye. Wilma's maximum intensity is estimated to have been 185 mph a few hours after the 882 mb pressure. On October 20, Wilma weakened slightly and turned northwestward toward the northeastern Yucatan Peninsula. Late on October 21, the slow-moving hurricane made landfall over Cozumel, followed by landfall early the next day over the northeastern Yucatan Peninsula - both at Category 4 intensity. Wilma moved slowly and weakened over northeastern Yucatan, emerging over the Gulf of Mexico early on October 23 as a Category 2 hurricane. Later that day it accelerated northeastward toward southern Florida. The hurricane strengthened over the Gulf waters, and its center made landfall near Cape Romano around 1030 UTC October 24 as a Category 3 hurricane. The eye crossed the Florida Peninsula in less than five hours, moving into the Atlantic just north of Palm Beach as a Category 2 hurricane. Wilma briefly re-intensified just east of Florida, then weakened thereafter. The hurricane moved rapidly northeastward over the western Atlantic and became extratropical about 230 miles southeast of Halifax, Nova Scotia late on October 25. The remnants of Wilma were absorbed by another low late the next day.

Wilma brought hurricane conditions to the northeastern Yucatan Peninsula and the adjacent islands, as well as to southern Florida. In Mexico, Cancun reported 10-minute average winds of 100 mph with a gust to 130 mph at 0000 UTC October 22, while Cozumel reported a pressure of 928.0 mb late on October 21. The Isla Mujeres reported 62.05 inches of rain during the hurricane's passage. In Florida, a South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) station in Lake Okeechobee reported 15-minute average winds of 92 mph with a gust to 112 mph at 1500 UTC October 24, while a nearby SFWMD station in Belle Glade reported a gust to 117 mph. Ten tornadoes occurred in Florida due to Wilma.

Twenty-two deaths have been directly attributed to Wilma: 12 in Haiti, 1 in Jamaica, 4 in Mexico, and 5 in Florida. The hurricane caused severe damage in northeastern Yucatan, including Cancun and Cozumel, and widespread damage estimated at $16.8 billion in southern Florida. Wilma also produced major floods in western Cuba.

The 882 mb pressure reported in Wilma is the lowest central pressure on record in an Atlantic hurricane, breaking the old record of 888 mb set by Hurricane Gilbert in September 1988. The central pressure fell 88 mb in 12 hours, which shatters the record of 48 mb in 12 hours held by Hurricane Allen in August 1980.

The National Hurricane Center also maintains the official Tropical Cyclone Report for Hurricane Wilma (PDF).

For an interactive map of Hurricane Wilma visit the NOAA Coastal Services Center.

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Hurricane Ike 2008

Click for a larger map of Wilma
Ike was a long-lived and major Cape Verde hurricane that caused extensive damage and many deaths across portions of the Caribbean and along the coasts of Texas and Louisiana. It originated from a well-defined tropical wave that moved off the west coast of Africa on August 28 and then became a tropical depression on September 1 about 775 miles west of the Cape Verde Islands. The depression quickly strengthened to a tropical storm later that day. Ike became a hurricane on September 3, and Ike reached an estimated peak intensity of 145 mph (Category 4) on September 4 when it was located 550 miles northeast of the Leeward Islands. After weakening briefly, Ike regained Category 4 status just before moving across the Turks and Caicos Islands on September 7. Ike then passed over Great Inagua Island in the southeastern Bahamas at Category 3 strength.

Ike turned westward and made landfall along the northeast coast of Cuba in the province of Holguin early on September 8 with maximum sustained winds estimated near 135 mph (Category 4). Ike made a second landfall in Cuba over the extreme southeastern part of the province of Pinar del Rio on September 9, with winds of 80 mph (Category 1). It moved into the southeastern Gulf of Mexico later that day.

Ike developed a large wind field as it moved northwestward across the Gulf of Mexico over the next 3 days, with tropical-storm-force winds extending up to 275 miles from the center and hurricane-force winds extending up to 115 miles from the center. The hurricane gradually intensified as it moved across the Gulf toward the Texas coast. Ike made landfall over the north end of Galveston Island in the early morning hours of September 13 as a Category 2 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 110 mph. The hurricane weakened as it moved inland across eastern Texas and Arkansas and became extratropical over the middle Mississippi Valley on September 14. It then moved rapidly through the Ohio valley and into Canada, producing wind gusts to hurricane force along the way.

Grand Turk Island reported sustained winds of 116 mph as the center of Ike crossed the island. Storm surges of 15-20 feet above normal tide levels occurred along the Bolivar Peninsula of Texas and in much of the Galveston Bay area, with surges of up to 10 feet above normal occurring as far east as south central Louisiana. Storm total rainfalls from Ike were as much as 19 inches in southeastern Texas and 14 inches in Cuba.

Ike left a long trail of death and destruction. It is estimated that flooding and mud slides killed 74 people in Haiti and 2 in the Dominican Republic, compounding the problems caused by Fay, Gustav, and Hanna. The Turks and Caicos Islands and the southeastern Bahamas sustained widespread damage to property. Seven deaths were reported in Cuba. Ike's storm surge devastated the Bolivar Peninsula of Texas, and surge, winds, and flooding from heavy rains caused widespread damage in other portions of southeastern Texas, western Louisiana, and Arkansas. Twenty people were killed in these areas, with 34 others still missing. Property damage from Ike as a hurricane is estimated at $19.3 billion. Additionally, as an extratropical system over the Ohio valley, Ike was directly or indirectly responsible for 28 deaths and more than $1 billion in property damage.



 


Be sure to check out the studies on this Website. The following are links to studies on this Website that will greatly enrich your Spiritual Knowledge of the Bible and more so towards the soon coming Great Tribulation Period, the Second Coming of the Lord Jesus Christ, the Millennial Reign and the Eternal Heavenly City.

Here are my Websites:  When I first started each Website, they contained different studies, but I have decided to add all the same studies to each Website, other than on the Audio Bible Sermons Website;  www.BibleSermonsMP3.com  .

www.BibleSermonsMP3.com

www.BibleClass123.com

www.BibleSermons123.com

www.KensBibleClass.com

www.TribulationPeriod1.com

www.TribulationPeriod12.com

www.TribulationPeriod123.com

www.Tribulation101.com

      
Website Index


The following studies are from the "Prophecy Section 2" on this Website.
How Large is the Antichrist's Kingdom?,  Hosea's 1,000 Year Days
Alive and Coming Soon to Rule and Reign
The Remnant of Israel,  Middle East Events,  Arab Nations Attack Israel
Remnant of Messiah,  Nuclear Weapons
War Contingency Plan,  1, 260 Days,  Islamic Conglomerate,  Negev Wilderness
Fossil WatersAll Nations of the World
Nation of Israel,  Peace and Safety,  Islamic Jihad,  Koran,  Holy War
Catholic Beliefs,  Pope,  Sons of God
Pestilences,  Famine,  Middle East Peace,  House of Israel
Jewish Graveyard,  Valley of Dry Bones,  I Am The Lord
Messiah the Prince,  Land of Magog,  Meshech and Tubal
Syrian Antichrist,  The Gentile Age,  Peace with Security
Sheba and Dedan,  Islamic Terrorists,  Jacob's Trouble
Arabah Fault,  Islamic Leaders,  Blitzkrieg Strike into Israel
Antichrist's Army,  Attack of Gog,  Trouble Times in the Nation of Israel
Run To and Fro,  Watch the Terrorists Groups
Middle East Zone,  Armageddon War,  Battle of Armageddon
The Glorious Land,  Jihad - Holy War,  Arab Nations
Islamic Neighbors,  Syria, Iran and Iraq,  Antichrist in Cairo,
Egypt,  Jerusalem Temple,  European Common Market
FAMINES, PESTILENCES, EARTHQUAKES AND JESUS!
Desolation of Jerusalem,  Seventy Weeks of Years,  Kingdom of God
Lightning Jihad,  Security is Safety
Besieged by their Enemies,  The Terrorists Groups
O' Daughter of Troops,  Israel's Messiah

The following studies are from the "Prophecy Section 14" on this Website.

The following studies are from the "Prophecy Section 30" on this Website.

From:  Bible Study Section 11

Gog is Chief Prince Of Meshech & Tubal – Russia Land Of Magog

From:  Bible Study Section 12


From:  Bible Study Section 13 & 14
ASHES OF RED HEIFER CASTS A LONG SHADOW

From:  Bible Study Section 14
ORGE WRATH PREVIEW BECOMES A FIERCE THUMOS WRATH
WORLDWIDE FALSE DOCTRINE TEACHING

From:  Bible Study Section 15
FALSE DOCTRINE
PRE-STAGE OF EZEKIEL 38 & 39 PROPHECY
VISIT BY TRIBULATION HORROR

From:  Bible Study Section 16
SEALS 5 & 6 INTRODUCING 7 TRUMPS

From:  Tribulation 01, 02, 03, 04, & 05
#5 SINKING SHIPS AND SHAKING SHORES
#6 THE SHAFT ABYSS
#7 THE HEAVEN DEPARTS
#8 THE SHAFT ABYSS
#9 THE HEAVEN DEPARTS
#10 LIGHT AT NIGHT
#11 EVERY EYE SHALL SEE HIM
#12 WORMWOOD
#13 SHAKING EARTH, DISAPPEARING HEAVEN, AND FALLING STARS
#14 Noisome and Grievous Sores
#15 NOISOME AND GRIEVOUS SORES
#16 THE IDUMEAN WINEPRESS
#17 THE GREAT WINEPRESS OF GOD
#18 Therefore Hell hath Enlarged Herself
#19 The Valley of Decision
#20 God Slowly Forms a Great Valley
#21 God Suddenly Makes a Great Valley
#22 God Forms a Dry Highway
#23 God Smites the Great Euphrates
#24 God Restructures the Jordan Valley
#25 God Lifts His Land and His City
#26 God Forms a Spring on a Temple Mount
#27 God Digs a River Bed
#28 God Divides the Great City
#29 God Splits a River
#30 God Heals the Eastern Sea
#31 God Weaves a Breadbasket
#32 God Waters His Breadbasket
#33 God Fills His Breadbasket
#34 How Large is the Antichrist’s Kingdom?
#35 Hosea’s 1000 Year Days
#36 Alive and Coming Soon to Rule and Reign
#37 THE REMNANT OF ISRAEL, PAST, PRESENT, & FUTURE!

 As of April
17, 2016
These are all of the internal pages I will add to this Website.
These above links are studies already on this Website and I have simply made the longer pages into individual pages to help locate the topics.
All of the internal links are finished.
I suggest you learn as much as possible, while you still have time!!!

The following are the last studies that were added to this Website. I will not be adding any more studies to this Website. I will be spending more time reading the hundreds of books that I have.

There is ample information on this Website about the Tribulation Period and the Second Coming of the Lord Jesus Christ and the Millennial Reign. There is not much else I can add. I've worked on this Website for the past seven years and it's time to more on in my life to something else!!!

Anger and Wrath of God
Antichrist Islamic Attack Events up to the Second Advent of Christ
Are You Teachable as a Christian Believer?
End of the World
GOD sent Angels to Destroy
Parable of the Talents and the Ten Pounds
THE ANTICHRIST HORN WILL INITIALLY PREVAIL AGAINST ISRAEL
The Day of the Lord
The Fury of the Lord upon the Wicked of the World
The Islamic Antichrist of the “Middle East” Caliphate
The Jewish Remnant in Israel will be Protected
The Moon into Blood… What does this mean?
The Reality of "Hell"
Ungodly Humanity Blaspheme the Name of the True God of Heaven
Who Will Be The Biblical Antichrist
Wicked of the World
Will You Live Outside the Heavenly City?

The following are some additional studies I've added:

 


      The “Great Tribulation Period” will begin when several “Arab nations and various Arab terrorist groups” unite to conduct a Jihad attack upon the Nation of Israel and according to the Bible, this will result in the death of 2/3rds of the Jewish population in Israel:


      (Zechariah 13:    [8] And it shall come to pass, that in all the land, saith the LORD, two parts therein shall be cut off and die; but the third shall be left therein. [9] And I will bring the third part through the fire, and will refine them as silver is refined, and will try them as gold is tried: they shall call on my name, and I will hear them: I will say, It is my people: and they shall say, The LORD is my God.)


      Afterwards forming an “Islamic Caliphate” that will last for 3 ½ years, consisting of “10 Arab countries” in the Middle East. Today is February 15, 2016, so I've told you far in advance and this event will happen in the next several years, after the current crisis in the Middle East calms down, then the Islamic Forces will regroup and conduct this invasion and proceed to conquer Egypt and then establish the "Ten Arab/Islamic/Caliphate/Empire."


     There is ample information concerning this topic on this Website, you just have to take the time to read it. The same goes for the information regarding the Great Tribulation Period and the Second Coming of the Lord Jesus Christ that is on this site, you just have to read it. The majority of humanity does not have any idea concerning these Biblical subjects and will be caught by surprise when these events draw near. There is no excuse for you to be ignorant, when the information is right here in front of you.


     There are also hundreds of Audio Bible Sermons that explain all of these subjects in great detail on my other Website, which is:  www.BibleSermonsMP3.com  .


     I encourage you to take the time to listen to them, while the Internet is still available. Once the Great Tribulation Period starts, the transmission lines will certainly fail and this information will not be available to you. Make good use of this knowledge while you still have time...


     The Biblical “Antichrist” will be the “Caliph of this 10 Arab Empire”. This will be an "Islamic Empire" as foretold in the Book of Daniel and in the Book of Revelation.

      

Daniel 2: [31] Thou, O king, sawest, and behold a great image. This great image, whose brightness was excellent, stood before thee; and the form thereof was terrible. [32] This image's head was of fine gold, his breast and his arms of silver, his belly and his thighs of brass, [33] His legs of iron, his feet part of iron and part of clay. [34] Thou sawest till that a stone was cut out without hands, which smote the image upon his feet that were of iron and clay, and break them to pieces.


Daniel 2:  [41] And whereas thou sawest the feet and toes, part of potters' clay, and part of iron, the kingdom shall be divided; but there shall be in it of the strength of the iron, forasmuch as thou sawest the iron mixed with miry clay. [42] And as the toes of the feet were part of iron, and part of clay, so the kingdom shall be partly strong, and partly broken. [43] And whereas thou sawest iron mixed with miry clay, they shall mingle themselves with the seed of men: but they shall not cleave one to another, even as iron is not mixed with clay. [44] And in the days of these kings shall the God of heaven set up a kingdom, which shall never be destroyed: and the kingdom shall not be left to other people, but it shall break in pieces and consume all these kingdoms, and it shall stand for ever. [45] Forasmuch as thou sawest that the stone was cut out of the mountain without hands, and that it brake in pieces the iron, the brass, the clay, the silver, and the gold; the great God hath made known to the king what shall come to pass hereafter: and the dream is certain, and the interpretation thereof sure.


Revelation 13:  [1] And I stood upon the sand of the sea, and saw a beast rise up out of the sea, having seven heads and ten horns, and upon his horns ten crowns, and upon his heads the name of blasphemy. [2] And the beast which I saw was like unto a leopard, and his feet were as the feet of a bear, and his mouth as the mouth of a lion: and the dragon gave him his power, and his seat, and great authority. [3] And I saw one of his heads as it were wounded to death; and his deadly wound was healed: and all the world wondered after the beast. [4] And they worshipped the dragon which gave power unto the beast: and they worshipped the beast, saying, Who is like unto the beast? Who is able to make war with him? [5] And there was given unto him a mouth speaking great things and blasphemies; and power was given unto him to continue forty and two months. [6] And he opened his mouth in blasphemy against God, to blaspheme his name, and his tabernacle, and them that dwell in heaven.


Revelation 17:  [8] The beast that thou sawest was, and is not; and shall ascend out of the bottomless pit, and go into perdition: and they that dwell on the earth shall wonder, whose names were not written in the book of life from the foundation of the world, when they behold the beast that was, and is not, and yet is. [9] And here is the mind which hath wisdom. The seven heads are seven mountains, on which the woman sitteth. [10] And there are seven kings: five are fallen, and one is, and the other is not yet come; and when he cometh, he must continue a short space. [11] And the beast that was, and is not, even he is the eighth, and is of the seven, and goeth into perdition. [12] And the ten horns which thou sawest are ten kings, which have received no kingdom as yet; but receive power as kings one hour with the beast. [13] These have one mind, and shall give their power and strength unto the beast.       


     The following are the Trumpets and Vials of the Book of Revelation, which describe the general theme of this end time event known as the:  "Great Tribulation Period." There will be a Great Earthquake in the Jordan River Valley, which will bring about the calling of a truce regarding the Islamic Jihad Attack upon the Nation of Israel. This geological event will set in motion the earth changing events pertaining to the Seven Trumpets and the "Rapture" of any surviving Christian Believers at the 7th Trumpet and ending with the Seven Vials of Wrath.


      The "Second Coming of the Lord Jesus Christ" will occur after all of these event have been fulfilled, then He will begin His Millennial Reign, ruling from the Temple that will be constructed on the Jerusalem Temple Mount.


     In Revelation 8:1, seven Angels are given seven trumpets. Each trumpet announces the beginning of certain events which can be for a “worldwide” or “local” area. They can be for events on the surface of the earth, in the oceans, in the atmosphere or in the spiritual world.
 
Revelation 8:7 – 1st trumpet – volcanic activity begins on the earth destroying one third of the trees and all the green grass surrounding the volcano, from the heat blast, lava flow and falling ash.  

Revelation 8:8-9 – 2nd trumpet – volcanic activity begins in the oceans killing one third of sea life and producing worldwide tsunami waves, which destroy a third of the ships in port.


Revelation 8:10-11 - 3rd trumpet –a great comet strikes the earth, melts and is absorbed into the hydrological cycle, producing hydrocyanic acid, poisoning one third of the earth’s water supply, proceeded by a meteor storm as the comet begins its atmospheric entrance.


Revelation 8:12 – 4th trumpet – a dramatic increase in worldwide volcanic activity, creates a dust haze over a third of the earth.


Revelation 9:1-12 – 5th trumpet – a massive chain of worldwide volcanic eruptions and releasing of demonic beings from the earth’s interior, which torment the spiritually lost  of humanity, that is: non-Christian (True) Believers for five months. There are great masses of people who outwardly claim to be Christian Believers, but the demonic spirits know the difference and these fakers will be tormented in the same group as the spiritually lost, because they actually are spiritually lost. They will likewise end up in Hades, as with all spiritually lost souls and eventually be cast into the Lake of Fire, with the demons and the Devil, for the duration of eternal existence.


Revelation 9:13-21 – 6th trumpet – release of four demonic kings, which lead approximately 200 million demons to kill a third of the human population with fire, smoke and an intense sulfurous suffocating odor.


Revelation 11:15-19 – 7th trumpet – announces the time of the Judgment Day in order to give "Rewards to True and Faithful Christian Believers" or a rebuke to the majority of Christian Believers for their incorrect Worship and lack of service towards the Lord's work, before the Judgment Seat of the Lord Jesus Christ in the spiritual kingdom, understood as the Rapture and the occurrence of an earthquake and great volcanic hail upon the earth. By the time this event happens, there are not going to be very many True Christian Believers alive on the earth to Rapture-Out, just due to the simple fact over the past several generations, people in general have become harden to the Gospel of Salvation by Grace, therefore there are less people being saved and because a large section of the human population will have been killed by the events of Trumpets 1-6, including any True Christian Believers!!!
 

The Wrath Of God


The Apostle John explains the wrath of God in a picture of catastrophic terror and horrors coming upon the earth because of the wickedness of humanity and in order to make necessary changes in the geological structure in the land of Israel.  This period of the wrath of God lasts only for about 45 days.These events occur after the Rapture of the Saved from the earth. They are a continuation and an increase of intensity of the seven trumpets which have just been completed.  The entire text is found in Revelation 16:1-21.

Revelation 16:2 – 1st plague – a shift in the magnetic field of the earth, from the earthquakes, leaving the earth temporarily without its protective shield, resulting in cosmic radiation mutilating the human flesh of those who worship the beast or antichrist. The Biblical antichrist is the leader of the Islamic Caliphate of the Ten Arab Empire that will be formed in the Middle East.


Revelation 16:3 – 2nd plague – the heating of the oceans by undersea lava causing the reproduction of various dinoflagellates at a fantastic rate, producing oxidation and red tide, respectively. This event will bring about a massive destruction of aquatic life throughout the world oceans.


Revelation 16:4-7 – 3rd plague –a poisoning of the earth’s freshwater supply by a comets release of methyl cyanide, hydrogen cyanide and a whole range of cyanogenic poisonous gases into the hydrological cycle. This comet will most likely enter the atmosphere over the "Old World" landmass.


Revelation 16:8-9 – 4th plague – destruction of the ozone layer by volcanic activity, allowing penetration of ultraviolet radiation causing a burning skin cancer.


Revelation 16:10-11 – 5th plague – a massive pyroclastic holocaust from volcanic lava upon wicked humanity.


Revelation 16:12-16 – 6th plague –the releasing of three evil spirits, causing people to worship the antichrist and to gather for the battle of Armageddon, including the diversion of the Euphrates River towards the Jordan River valley.


Revelation 16:17-21 – 7th plague – the greatest earthquake to ever have occurred since humanity has been on earth will take place in the Jordan river valley,  producing a chain reaction of earthquakes, which will cause the cities of the nations of the world to fall into ruin, ending with catastrophic global volcanic activity, developing a single dust cloud encircling the entire planet earth. It is during this event, that sets in motion a worldwide shifting of the tectonic plates, which will affect the subduction zone in Italy. This will activate the Alban Hills Volcanic Complex near Rome, Italy and will burn the city with Volcanic Fire. The land will sink below sea level and the Tiber River, along with the waters of the Mediterranean Sea will cover the remains of the city. This will bring about the final event of the "Great Tribulation Period" which will be the "Destruction of the Vatican City" by Volcanic Fire...  The Future Destruction of Rome, Italy
     
        

The “Creator GOD”

Used the Earth to Destroy Humanity in the Past and will do it Again in the Near Future


The Great Flood:   Genesis 6: [5] And GOD saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually. [6] And it repented the LORD that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him at his heart. [7] And the LORD said, I will destroy man whom I have created from the face of the earth; both man, and beast, and the creeping thing, and the fowls of the air; for it repenteth me that I have made them. [11] The earth also was corrupt before God, and the earth was filled with violence. [12] And God looked upon the earth, and, behold, it was corrupt; for all flesh had corrupted his way upon the earth. [13] And God said unto Noah, The end of all flesh is come before me; for the earth is filled with violence through them; and, behold, I will destroy them with the earth. [17] And, behold, I, even I, do bring a flood of waters upon the earth, to destroy all flesh, wherein is the breath of life, from under heaven; and everything that is in the earth shall die.

 

Genesis 7: [4] For yet seven days, and I will cause it to rain upon the earth forty days and forty nights; and every living substance that I have made will I destroy from off the face of the earth. [23] And every living substance was destroyed which was upon the face of the ground, both man, and cattle, and the creeping things, and the fowl of the heaven; and they were destroyed from the earth: and Noah only remained alive, and they that were with him in the ark.

 

Sodom and Gomorrah:   Genesis 13: [13] But the men of Sodom were wicked and sinners before the LORD exceedingly.

 

Genesis 18: [17] And the LORD said, Shall I hide from Abraham that thing which I do; [20] And the LORD said, Because the cry of Sodom and Gomorrah is great, and because their sin is very grievous;

 

Genesis 19: [1] And there came two angels to Sodom at even; [13] For we will destroy this place, because the cry of them is waxen great before the face of the LORD; and the LORD hath sent us to destroy it. [24] Then the LORD rained upon Sodom and upon Gomorrah brimstone and fire from the LORD out of heaven; [27] And Abraham got up early in the morning to the place where he stood before the LORD: [28] And he looked toward Sodom and Gomorrah, and toward all the land of the plain, and beheld, and, lo, the smoke of the country went up as the smoke of a furnace.


There are several basic purposes for the “Great Tribulation Period” ending with the “Wrath of God”. It is to make changes in the tilt of the earth and to the Land Structure of Israel to ensure that it will be the Breadbasket of the world during the Millennial Reign; to destroy the Arab nations in the Middle East and to destroy the “immoral people” of the world, who have grossly influenced the general population and have caused them to turn away from God, thereby causing them to become ever more immersed into the very lowest state of immoral attitude and actions.


The Great Tribulation Period:   Revelation 11: [15] And the seventh angel sounded;… [18] And shouldest destroy them which destroy the earth. [19] …and there were lightnings, and voices, and thunderings, and an earthquake, and great hail.

 

Revelation 11:18.   The Greek Text:

  καὶ διαφθεῖραι τοὺς διαφθείροντας τὴν γῆν

 

In Revelation 11:18, the Greek word for the second English word “destroy” has to do with morality. With an in-depth study from the New Testament Greek language, this phrase can be translated as: {and destroy and bring to ruin, causing them to perish, to kill them, which destroy by morally corrupting the occupants of the earth and have caused the inhabitants to become thoroughly rotten, by changing their minds and morals for the worse.}

 

Revelation 16: [17] And the seventh angel poured out his vial into the air; and there came a great voice out of the temple of heaven, from the throne, saying, It is done. [18] And there were voices, and thunders, and lightnings; and there was a great earthquake, such as was not since men were upon the earth, so mighty an earthquake, and so great. [19] And the great city was divided into three parts, and the cities of the nations fell: and great Babylon came in remembrance before God, to give unto her the cup of the wine of the fierceness of his wrath. [20] And every island fled away, and the mountains were not found. [21] And there fell upon men a great hail out of heaven, every stone about the weight of a talent: and men blasphemed God because of the plague of the hail; for the plague thereof was exceeding great.

 

The next destruction of humanity will be by:

Earthquakes and Volcanic Fire!!!



 



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